Course Evaluations Deadline 4/28
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ArtCenter Extension offers a wide range of hands-on non-degree courses for adults. We also offer classes for teens and kids in grades 4–8.
Introduction To Surface Design

ACX-258

Explore styles and techniques used in surface design and discover the limitless possibilities—and career opportunities—of this burgeoning arena! Review designer case studies, product categories beyond textiles, and themes in demand by manufacturers. Digitally scan hand-drawn artwork; set up accurate repeat patterns; change colors, scale and textures; and color index for mass production. Finally, develop coordinated surface design collections, take a collection from concept through refinement, and apply designs to products. An ideal course for advanced students or graphic design, textile design and illustration professionals. Prerequisites: Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator skills; basic drawing, color theory, and design; or by permission of an ArtCenter advisor.

The Business of Photography

ACX-494W

During this jam-packed one-day seminar, instructor Dana Hursey will discuss “the business”—how to launch your photography business and keep it growing. Hursey will share his insider’s knowledge and business practices on the day-to-day operations of running his company. Topics will include business considerations, needs and professional practices, equipment, estimating, production, pre- and post-production, invoicing and getting paid. Please bring your portfolio to class. Class meets off campus in the Pasadena area. Enrolled students will receive address and directions.

EV Design Basics

ACX-424W

Vehicle electrification is the single largest disrupter in the global automotive industry today. In this course, you will first be introduced to and then dive head-first into the world of the electric vehicle (EV) with a focus on passenger vehicle design. Gain an understanding of EV history and milestones, regulations, changing consumer preferences and the present market. Current and future technology as well as vehicle architecture (packaging) will be studied. Your newly acquired knowledge will be applied to two unique and futuristic design concepts. Prerequisites: Visual Communication and Form Development and either Intro- duction to Transportation Design or Introduction to Product and Transportation Design, or by permission of an ArtCenter advisor.

Game Dev Bootcamp

ACX-407

Gain hands-on experience in this crash course that focuses on the role of art and design in game development. Weekly assignments and feedback will cover the fundamentals of research, gameplay design, prototyping, character design, environment design, prop design and UI. Each lesson builds upon the one prior, all leading to the final project: a gameplay mock-up and playable prototype. This is an ideal course for students and professionals looking to gain insight into the creative career opportunities in games. Prerequisites: Previous drawing experience, intermediate-level Adobe Photoshop skills, and access to games.

Still Life: Collage, Paint, Print

ACX-404W

What visual information do we include or exclude to best express what is essential? How do we make choices and allow our individual voice to speak? In this class, we’ll consider how compositional structure influences meaning and examine works by a variety of historical and contemporary artists. Work directly from still-life setups to see shape, color, value and the space they occupy. Media includes collage made from painted papers (as well as found papers), charcoal, ink, acrylic and/or gouache, as well as monotype printing. Demonstrations and critique are woven into the course. Prerequisite: Some painting experience recommended.

Designing Pop-up Books Workshop

ACX-446W

Explore 3D paper engineering mechanisms used in the publishing world—everything from children’s pop-up books, pull tabs and novelty board books to pop-up greeting cards and fine art installation environments. In this 10-week course, you will animate your ideas using paper as your surface and tool, learn techniques to create movement from 2D to 3D, and develop a concept proposal ready for submission to your specific genre. Pre-press production and publishing submission requirements will also be covered. Skills learned can be applied across a range of disciplines, including entertainment, illustration, graphic design, fine art, product and environmental design.

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Library zine pop-up 2018

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Dave Cassell
Introduction to Filmmaking
Instructor: Devin Hawker

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Sage Hall
Introduction to Filmmaking
Instructor: Devin Hawker

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Gigi Scully
Direct Still Life Painting
Instructor: Anne Saitzyk

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Rose Wang
Photographing People
Instructor: David Sotelo

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Yejin Oh
Introduction to Surface Design
Instructor: Debra Valencia

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Leticia Lelevier
Color and Light in Painting
Instructor: Mary Winterfeld

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Erik Bianchi
Graphic Design
Instructor: Annie Huang Luck

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Julie Watson
Collage and Mixed Media
Instructor: Delbar Shahbaz

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Josiah Tersieff
Typography 1
Instructor: Adele Bass

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Henry Higginson
Graphic Design
Instructor: Annie Huang Luck

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David Knapp
Digital Painting for Entertainment
Instructor: Justin Pichetrungsi

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Katie Shipley
Introduction to Surface Design
Instructor: Debra Valencia

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Alexi Curelop
Intro to Graphic Design
Instructor: Dan Hoy

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Anna Silvey
Introduction to Painting
Instructor: Anne Saitzyk

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David Knapp
Digital Painting for Entertainment
Instructor: Justin Pichetrungsi

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Blake Van Noy
Intermediate Photo Methods
Instructor: Ken Merfeld

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Erin Harpur
Graphic Design
Instructor: Annie Huang Luck

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Angie Maccambridge
Direct Figure Painting
Instructor: Anne Saitzyk

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Audrey Zaldumbide
Introduction to Package Design
Instructor: Dan Hoy

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Max Chau
Basics of Digital Photography
Instructor: John Deyto

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Myron Kaufman
Abstract Painting and Composition
Instructor: Mary Winterfeld

Alumna Alison Elizabeth Taylor Captures The Disappearing Landscape

Alison Elizabeth Taylor

Alison Elizabeth Taylor

When Brooklyn-based artist Alison Elizabeth Taylor (BFA 01 Illustration) returns home to visit family in and around her hometown of Las Vegas, she sees both more and less than she remembers: The open desert she’d played in as a kid seemed to be tattering while the city sprawls around it. Where she once saw “beautiful, endless mountain ranges,” she now saw tract homes and cul-de-sacs.

“Weather patterns are very different now,” she says. “A cloud of grasshoppers just descended on the Strip – it was almost Biblical.” Lake Mead, which feeds Vegas the way the Colorado River provides water for Los Angeles, “has gone down so much it’s got a bathtub ring.” 

The shifting state of the place she once called home has inspired Taylor—an ArtCenter alum who’s made a name for herself working in the Renaissance tradition of marquetry—to approach the even-older tradition of landscape painting with new eyes.

Some of her pieces include bits of nature—a melancholy palm tree, desert hills illuminated by a queasy light—behind motels, gamblers, swimming pools or neon signs. (The effect is somewhere between Eric Fischl and Breaking Bad.) In a recent batch of work she hopes to show over the next year—of Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, now imperiled by the loss of federal protection—the embattled earth is the whole point. “They’re opening it up to oil and gas leases,” Taylor says. “It’s a nightmare; the ecosystem is very fragile.”

In April, four of Taylor’s pieces were included in the book Landscape Painting Now: From Pop Abstraction to New Romanticism. We seek in landscape, writes art historian Simon Schama, a place of myth, “a consolation for our mortality.” Taylor’s work seems to answer the question: What happens to landscape painting when the landscape begins to disappear?

Taylor came to ArtCenter after several years penning underground comics and working as layout editor at a weekly paper in Los Angeles. There was not much art in her Nevada upbringing, but she’d been turned on to visual storytelling by the work of graphic novelists Daniel Clowes and Julie Doucet, and wanted to learn more about painting and drawing.

At ArtCenter Extension (then-ArtCenter at Night)—where she enrolled, initially, in her mid-20s—Taylor got what she calls “an old-school education,” but one that was entirely open-ended. Some days she’d work on 50 gesture drawings of a live model; other times she’d paint a scene in early-morning shadow and then again at the late-afternoon magic hour to see how light worked. The rigor and repetition paid off. “It makes you such an observer to do life drawing,” says Taylor. “You just learn to see. A lot of schools don’t do that.” But she also got to study with contemporary artists like acclaimed painters Rob and Christian Clayton, and by the end was working out her own ideas.

One day, she picked up a piece of wood-grain contact paper at a 99-cent store on Sunset Boulevard, and it piqued her curiosity about wood textures. Later, seeing a classic Italian work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art gave her a fuller sense of the possibilities of working with wood. Unexpectedly, Taylor became perhaps her generation’s leading practitioner of the old, very formal craft of marquetry, inspiring a 2008 New York Times profile, “An Artist Breathes New Life Into Renaissance Ways With Wood.”

Despite her reputation for marquetry, Taylor feels herself now coming back to painting: Even pieces built from hundreds of pieces of wood veneer typically have painted sections. Partly, it’s an aesthetic thing: “There’s such a nice contrast between flatness and depth,” she says. But it’s also because she was aching to continue the painting education she got at ArtCenter.

The resulting hybrid, art critic Barry Schwabsky writes in Landscape Painting Now, creates “an estrangement between her images and their vehicle. A disconcerting sense of artifice is the first thing her works convey, and then the specific content of the imagery filters more gradually through that."

The estrangement is important to how Taylor works. In fact, even before she began worrying about the ravaged environment, Taylor had a fraught relationship with landscape. Because much of what she saw before her art-school days was borderline kitsch—calendar art and bucolic, exaggerated nature scenes—“it made me not trust the form.” She also realized she couldn’t beat nature at its own game. “Why would I want to compete with nature, when a sunset was already so beautiful to experience?”

Taylor eventually came to terms with the genre. These days, she’s helping to redefine the possibilities of landscape painting in a fraught age. “For me it’s like the landscape was just a background,” she says. “But now it’s the foreground.”

 
12.02 -01.17

ACX Spring 2020 registration period

12.05

ACX Spring 2020 scholarship deadline

01.21

ACX Spring 2020 classes begin

01.24

Last day to add a class

03.06

Last day to drop a class

04.20 -04.22

Spring Experience ACX