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ArtCenter Extension offers a wide range of hands-on non-degree courses for adults (ACX). For teens and kids, visit ACX Teens and ACX Kids
Paper Making with Plants
Paper Making with Plants

ACX-444W

Handmade paper is appreciated for its unique qualities and the skilled craft involved in making each sheet. Papermaking can be a great catalyst for bookmaking, printmaking, collage and drawing, or as an art form in itself. In this introductory papermaking workshop, you will experiment with the process of turning plant fiber into handmade paper. Learn how to form basic sheets of paper with a mold and deckle, and expand upon that skill by exploring ways to manipulate the pulp. After surveying a range of papermaking techniques, each student will be able to focus on their own self-directed project, with guidance and support from the instructor.

A Day with a Pro

ACX-408W

Want the inside scoop on what it takes to run your own photo business? This freeform one-day workshop is your opportunity to ask questions and get the answers you need from commercial advertising photographer Dana Hursey. Get his unique perspective, insights and know-how on the day-to-day realities of being a commercial photographer, and pick up some creative and technical tips to boot! Bring your technical and creative questions about equipment, lighting, production, retouching, marketing and resources.

Crafting a Meaningful Career

ACX-481 01

Change is inevitable. By some accounts, Americans today will have seven or more career changes during their working lives. Whether big or small, all career changes involve introspection, risk assessment, and consideration of the impact your decisions will have on those you care about most. In this information-packed, vital and enlightening course you will have the opportunity to examine the pros and cons of past employment, deep dive into what motivates you, and create a plan to confidently move on to the next level. Discover your unique purpose, redefine your goals, and connect with a growing network of talented people who are living their dreams.

Intro to Wearable Product Design
Intro to Wearable Product Design

ACX-454X 01

This new design course allows you to explore wearables, soft goods and fashion through the lens of product design. Projects can include: bags, footwear, wearable tech, fashion or functional apparel. Work on one project through all the stages of the product design process: brainstorming, trend research, market research, fashion/product sketching, form and material experimentation, and problem solving with the final goal to create a finished sample with limited use of equipment in the Sewing Lab. In-class discussions will cover careers and opportunities.

Crafting your Creative Brand
Crafting your Creative Brand

ACX-469 01

In order to get noticed and build a long-term creative career, freelancers and artists must develop their own distinct, marketable brands. In this course ideal for creative entrepreneurs, aspiring creative professionals, designers, photographers, illustrators and artists, you will explore your aspirational goals, core values and distinct approach as the basis for designing your visual brand identity. You will focus on crafting and presenting a consistent visual message relevant to clients, collectors or patrons. Approaches to marketing, content creation, curation and establishing authorship will be explored. No prerequisite.

The Thriving Creativepreneur Parts 1 and 2

ACX-448W and ACX-449W

Learn how to sidestep starving artist syndrome! Specifically designed to help independent creatives thrive in the gig economy, these 7-week workshops address the total picture of a freelance business. Whether you’re currently freelancing, just starting out, or simply curious, you’ll learn the crucial mindset shifts necessary to transition from “creative” to “creativepreneur.”

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Library zine pop-up 2018

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Dave Cassell
Introduction to Filmmaking
Instructor: Devin Hawker

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Sage Hall
Introduction to Filmmaking
Instructor: Devin Hawker

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Gigi Scully
Direct Still Life Painting
Instructor: Anne Saitzyk

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Rose Wang
Photographing People
Instructor: David Sotelo

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Yejin Oh
Introduction to Surface Design
Instructor: Debra Valencia

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Leticia Lelevier
Color and Light in Painting
Instructor: Mary Winterfeld

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Erik Bianchi
Graphic Design
Instructor: Annie Huang Luck

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Julie Watson
Collage and Mixed Media
Instructor: Delbar Shahbaz

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Josiah Tersieff
Typography 1
Instructor: Adele Bass

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Henry Higginson
Graphic Design
Instructor: Annie Huang Luck

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David Knapp
Digital Painting for Entertainment
Instructor: Justin Pichetrungsi

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Katie Shipley
Introduction to Surface Design
Instructor: Debra Valencia

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Alexi Curelop
Intro to Graphic Design
Instructor: Dan Hoy

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Anna Silvey
Introduction to Painting
Instructor: Anne Saitzyk

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David Knapp
Digital Painting for Entertainment
Instructor: Justin Pichetrungsi

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Blake Van Noy
Intermediate Photo Methods
Instructor: Ken Merfeld

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Erin Harpur
Graphic Design
Instructor: Annie Huang Luck

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Angie Maccambridge
Direct Figure Painting
Instructor: Anne Saitzyk

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Audrey Zaldumbide
Introduction to Package Design
Instructor: Dan Hoy

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Max Chau
Basics of Digital Photography
Instructor: John Deyto

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Myron Kaufman
Abstract Painting and Composition
Instructor: Mary Winterfeld

Alumna Alison Elizabeth Taylor Captures The Disappearing Landscape

Alison Elizabeth Taylor

Alison Elizabeth Taylor

When Brooklyn-based artist Alison Elizabeth Taylor (BFA 01 Illustration) returns home to visit family in and around her hometown of Las Vegas, she sees both more and less than she remembers: The open desert she’d played in as a kid seemed to be tattering while the city sprawls around it. Where she once saw “beautiful, endless mountain ranges,” she now saw tract homes and cul-de-sacs.

“Weather patterns are very different now,” she says. “A cloud of grasshoppers just descended on the Strip – it was almost Biblical.” Lake Mead, which feeds Vegas the way the Colorado River provides water for Los Angeles, “has gone down so much it’s got a bathtub ring.” 

The shifting state of the place she once called home has inspired Taylor—an ArtCenter alum who’s made a name for herself working in the Renaissance tradition of marquetry—to approach the even-older tradition of landscape painting with new eyes.

Some of her pieces include bits of nature—a melancholy palm tree, desert hills illuminated by a queasy light—behind motels, gamblers, swimming pools or neon signs. (The effect is somewhere between Eric Fischl and Breaking Bad.) In a recent batch of work she hopes to show over the next year—of Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, now imperiled by the loss of federal protection—the embattled earth is the whole point. “They’re opening it up to oil and gas leases,” Taylor says. “It’s a nightmare; the ecosystem is very fragile.”

In April, four of Taylor’s pieces were included in the book Landscape Painting Now: From Pop Abstraction to New Romanticism. We seek in landscape, writes art historian Simon Schama, a place of myth, “a consolation for our mortality.” Taylor’s work seems to answer the question: What happens to landscape painting when the landscape begins to disappear?

Taylor came to ArtCenter after several years penning underground comics and working as layout editor at a weekly paper in Los Angeles. There was not much art in her Nevada upbringing, but she’d been turned on to visual storytelling by the work of graphic novelists Daniel Clowes and Julie Doucet, and wanted to learn more about painting and drawing.

At ArtCenter Extension (then-ArtCenter at Night)—where she enrolled, initially, in her mid-20s—Taylor got what she calls “an old-school education,” but one that was entirely open-ended. Some days she’d work on 50 gesture drawings of a live model; other times she’d paint a scene in early-morning shadow and then again at the late-afternoon magic hour to see how light worked. The rigor and repetition paid off. “It makes you such an observer to do life drawing,” says Taylor. “You just learn to see. A lot of schools don’t do that.” But she also got to study with contemporary artists like acclaimed painters Rob and Christian Clayton, and by the end was working out her own ideas.

One day, she picked up a piece of wood-grain contact paper at a 99-cent store on Sunset Boulevard, and it piqued her curiosity about wood textures. Later, seeing a classic Italian work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art gave her a fuller sense of the possibilities of working with wood. Unexpectedly, Taylor became perhaps her generation’s leading practitioner of the old, very formal craft of marquetry, inspiring a 2008 New York Times profile, “An Artist Breathes New Life Into Renaissance Ways With Wood.”

Despite her reputation for marquetry, Taylor feels herself now coming back to painting: Even pieces built from hundreds of pieces of wood veneer typically have painted sections. Partly, it’s an aesthetic thing: “There’s such a nice contrast between flatness and depth,” she says. But it’s also because she was aching to continue the painting education she got at ArtCenter.

The resulting hybrid, art critic Barry Schwabsky writes in Landscape Painting Now, creates “an estrangement between her images and their vehicle. A disconcerting sense of artifice is the first thing her works convey, and then the specific content of the imagery filters more gradually through that."

The estrangement is important to how Taylor works. In fact, even before she began worrying about the ravaged environment, Taylor had a fraught relationship with landscape. Because much of what she saw before her art-school days was borderline kitsch—calendar art and bucolic, exaggerated nature scenes—“it made me not trust the form.” She also realized she couldn’t beat nature at its own game. “Why would I want to compete with nature, when a sunset was already so beautiful to experience?”

Taylor eventually came to terms with the genre. These days, she’s helping to redefine the possibilities of landscape painting in a fraught age. “For me it’s like the landscape was just a background,” she says. “But now it’s the foreground.”

 
04.13

Registration period begins

04.16

Scholarship deadline

05.15

Last day to register

05.18

Summer classes begin; Late registration and drop period begins

05.22

Last day to add a class

05.25

Memorial day, campus closed

07.03

Last day to drop a class

07.04

Independence Day, campus closed

08.17 -08.19

Summer Experience ACX 7 – 9 pm