Classes

Credits

5th Term Review

3

Fifth Term Review class is a preparation course to assist students for participating in their fifth term review. In this important review, students will need to present a body of current work to Fine Art Department core faculty, write a statement about their work, and demonstrate an ability to discuss directions and issues within their own artistic production. This course acts as a departmental gate between lower division "foundation" courses and upper division level classes based on individual pursuits, including their Senior Projects graduation exhibition. Fifth Term Review is a required class which acts as the prerequisite for ART 401 - Post Re-Thinking Art (6th term) and for ART451- Senior Projects 1 (7th term) and ART 452 Senior Projects 2 (8th term). NOTE: Previously entitled, Mid-Program Review, this review now takes places in the students fifth term - when a student meets the 60 units requirement.

Course number: ART-300
Prerequisite: Take ART-204, Art: Structures and Systems Must complete a minimum of 60 credits.

Advanced Drawing

3

Drawing has always been an important part of artistic practice from the simple thumbnail sketch to drawing as a primary medium. In the last ten years, drawing has become the topic of many books and exhibitions that chronicle drawings expanded definition in contemporary art. Advanced Drawing will explore the role of drawing in contemporary art through projects, lectures, critiques and field trips. The goal of this class is to challenge your definition of drawing, and to set into motion a personal drawing practice that fits your sensibilities as an artist. Students will leave this class with an expanded definition of drawing in the twenty first century.

Course number: ART-371
Prerequisite: Take FAR-101/ART-101, Re-Thinking Art

Advanced Painting

3

Advanced Painting is a class that will allow students the ability to create, develop and maintain a sophisticated studio practice in the field of painting. Students will research and develop an independent project in the field of painting that will be pursued throughout the term in a manner chosen by them that will culminate in final presentations and critiques at the end of the term. All iterations of the medium will be covered down to the most intimate detail and possibilities for surface and format will be explored completely. Students will be exposed in particular to techniques, formats and materials that have not been covered in previous less advanced classes as well as a deeper reading and understanding of more traditional mediums. All iterations of painting will be permitted and students will not be restricted to only a two dimensional format. Emphasis will be on the development and comprehension of course material as well as the creation of work that could potentially be used for portfolio and further advancement including graduate school application. There will also be a strong focus on examining the history of painting from the past to the immediate present and students will constantly be exposed to the extensive body of information that is contemporary painting. Museum, gallery visits and any other outside information will be an important part of the class as we will seek out any and all relevant information available during the course of the term. Students will be graded on the sophistication, development and presentation of their work. Class participation as well as the ability to pursue discourse within this chosen field will be very important and will factor into the grading process.

Course number: ART-311
Prerequisite: Take Art-101, Re-Thinking Art

Advanced Sculpture

3

Advanced Sculpture focuses on student-driven projects, moving forward from the material investigations and three-dimensional concepts introduced in Sculpture One. Students will gain deeper knowledge of sculpture history and the veins of contemporary sculpture. Initial concept development will be tested in multiple material experimentations and supported with additional workshops in new materials. Students develop presentation skills including more nuanced finishing details, installation strategies, and verbal and written articulation of ideas. Areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to--site and body, objects and props, monuments and ephemerality. Course work includes three projects with graded stages of development, readings with written responses, workshop exercises, installation and critique, and field trips.

Course number: ART-212
Prerequisite: n/a

Advanced Studio

3

"Advanced Studio" is a studio class for advanced undergraduate students working in all mediums. The purpose of the class is to provide ample studio time for students to develop their individual studio projects in an open studio/seminar environment under faculty guidance. The studio aspect of the class is enhanced by intensive weekly group critiques of new work or works-in-progress. Emphasis will be on creating a thematically cohesive body of work and/or ambitious project which reflects the culmination of knowledge and exploration the student has achieved. "Advance Studio" is a prerequisite (or co-requisite depending on credit units) for ART-451, "Senior Projects 1," and a prerequisite for ART-452, "Senior Projects 2". "Advanced Studio" can be taken in lieu of ART 401_"Post ReThinking Art."

Course number: ART-385
Prerequisite: Take ART-300, 5th Term Review

Advanced Video Art

3

Advanced Video Art builds on knowledges and practices gained in Video One and applies them to more complex projects. Readings, screenings, and discussions will enhance an understanding of contemporary discourses and conceptual frameworks of video and film in art. Students will work on independently driven projects that explore time-based media forms such as single channel video, analogue film production, video performance, and installation.

Course number: ART-277
Prerequisite: n/a

Art & Photography

3

Photography reflects the illogic of defining present day art-making as media-specific; it is a "field" produced out of the intersections of digital-imaging, drawing, cinema, performance, sculpture, painting, and even sound. In turn, photography stands released, so to speak, from its responsibilities as document and representation. In this course will look at photography as invention, play and experience, which addresses what-is-photography, what-is-now in the 21st century. This course is project based, and includes lectures, readings and discussions, visiting artists/curators. Critiques and discussions will be planned for individual student projects, as well as the production of a student-curated exhibition and small exhibition catalog. Studio hours (3.00) (3.00 cr), Pre-requisite: ART-204

Course number: ART-273
Prerequisite: Take FAR-204/ART-204, Art: Structure and Systems

Art As Land Acknowledgment

3

Art as Land Acknowledgment Through their creative practice, students will reflect on frameworks and concepts such as decolonization, settler colonialism, and healing, among others, to practice situating themselves within these unceded lands as allies, using land-based artmaking. Printmaking, augmented reality (AR), and other art forms will be mediums used to consider how to make actionable these land acknowledgments.

Course number: ART-319
Prerequisite: n/a

Art and Theory in Practice

3

This course aims to provide students with an overview of key theoretical concepts from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, and apply those concepts in a rigorous, generative way to artistic production. Special attention will be paid to history of critical theory-as-liberation., with an emphasis on post colonial, feminist, and Marxist thought.

Course number: ART-344
Prerequisite: n/a

Art in the Age of Neuroscience

3

Technical advances in brain imaging offer new insights into the neurological underpinnings of consciousness. Yet the new science of mind leaves many unanswered questions regarding philosophical, cultural and spiritual aspects of subjectivity. Who is the "I" that makes art and who is the "I" that experiences it? Drawing from a broad range of disciplines, this hybrid seminar / studio course examines questions of subjective experience while paying particular attention to media and linguistic theory, cognitive psychology and theories of consciousness. The material is topical and the readings are guided. Of paramount importance is your commitment. Active participation in discussions, activities, self-directed research and creative production is required.

Course number: ART-364
Prerequisite: n/a

Art: Structure and Systems

3

Art Structures and Systems is designed specifically for 4th Term Fine Art students who are now ready to examine their work through larger contexts. Students build a growing understanding of how their work (and that of others) is situated within structures and systems of knowledge, which inform not only art-making but also their experiences in the world. Additionally, this course focuses on the individual student's art-making as a developing art practice, which entails producing a small body of work and developing the tools needed to navigate and articulate the connections between one's making and thinking. This course is a pre-requisite for 5th Term Review.

Course number: ART-204
Prerequisite: Take Art-202, Studio Practice

Artist's Books

3

Artists' Books For students who want to explore making sequentially developed ideas in traditional and nontraditional book forms. Creating books is a powerful way to infuse your practice by finding new methods to come at ideas and themes, and it also increases visibility of your work and professional profile. Students will learn how to conceptualize and produce artists' books through assignments, critique and exposure to tools and materials. The course also includes field trips to see the works and studios of people who produce artists' books and/or run presses and print shops. Students will produce books intended for the production of multiple copies, rather than single copy hand-made volumes. Production techniques that will be covered and may be used for final production include silkscreen, offset, riso and digital printing as well as researching materials, papers and book binding methods. In addition to producing their own book works, students will research the history and methodologies of different book art practitioners, and study narrative and conceptual approaches to using sequential page formats.

Course number: ART-253
Prerequisite: n/a

Aux: Curatorial Practicum

3

Auxiliary: Curatorial Practicum This activity will look for strategies and coordinate the shared "visual display" areas at 870 while expanding student participatory ART experiences. This activity offers a "hands-on" experience for students interested in the practical nature of curating. Using a "cradle to grave" approach, we will identify issues, locate work, create communications surrounding exhibition experiences in the physical and digital environments: with the general public in mind. [This is not room planning, authorization seeking or permission granting activity.]

Course number: ART-233
Prerequisite: n/a

Berlin History and Artists

3

As one of the most vibrant art cultures in the world, Berlin is a highly multicultural with a rich and, most importantly, complex and difficult history. In this course, we will examine how notions of German identity have been shaped by that history and investigate its ramifications in contemporary art. The travel portion of the Berlin trip will visit museums, galleries and historical sites, as well as to meet artists and curators and attend performing art events. This class is composed of a pre-trip (four three-hour classes) comprised by seminars, lectures, readings, screenings and the immersive 10-day study-away experience in Berlin during the Spring/Summer break. PLO: 1. Firsthand exposure to the historical riches in Berlin. 2. The chance to put history into context. 3. Exposure to art and points of view other than those encountered in LA.

Course number: ART-802A
Prerequisite: n/a

Berlin History and Artists

1

A Berlin trip to visit the museums, galleries and historical sites, as well as to meet artists and curators and attend performing art events. PLO: 1. Firsthand exposure to the historical riches in Berlin. 2. The chance to put history into context. 3. Exposure to art and points of view other than those encountered in LA.

Course number: ART-801A
Prerequisite: n/a

Collaborative Magic

3

"Collaborative Magic, Creativity and the NFT Phenomenon" This class provides an opportunity to participate in a collaborative process. Collaboration can expand how you think about your creativity in relationship to others - aesthetically, socially, economically. In "CM" students will learn how to develop a collaborative project within an open model of sharing and discourse. It will be a creative adventure. "How can I use collaboration to make better design/art?" In this class, students will first invent/create/design a visual concept/project of their own individual making. These individual concepts/projects will then be brought together and synthesized within a group to produce an imaginative outcome, or hybrid. Experimentation is the bread and butter of this class and you are highly encouraged to push your boundaries and find new tools to express yourselves. During the class "studio-time," beside working through the collaborative problem-solving process, we will also discuss technology from the phenomenon of NFTs, which surfaced in popularity in only the last 12 months, algorithms and more. Students in all departments are welcome. All projects will be student-generated week by week. You do not need to have a project in mind to enroll in the class. The more varied our creative pool, the more prescient the final collaborative projects will become.

Course number: ART-245
Prerequisite: n/a

Collage

3

This studio course explores the history, practice and visual diversity in collage language. The course will be structured around three major projects that utilize the process of building a personal code/index using collage. Implementing found, observed and appropriated two-dimensional elements, students will create a visual language that best positions their ideas. Utilizing traditional and alternative ways of looking at pictures, students will investigate and research their biographical, geographical and or interpersonal connections to the images and objects that they love. These collections of media will be used as a catalyst to create narrative metaphors and sequential structures within their compositions. Students may use any medium to experiment and apply to the collage discourse. 3 credits

Course number: ART-262
Prerequisite: n/a

Compendium

3

Drawing is often used as a tool to reveal the creative thought process, or supplement a primary artistic medium further down the line (be that painting, sculpture, video, etc.). The goal of this course will be to develop a fluency with various approaches to drawing that may prove useful to the artist in the long-term. Each week the students will be given a prompt from which they will make a number of thoroughly conceived and subsequently execiued drawings or paintings on paper, employing various mediums (graphite, ink, watercolor, etc.). Class time will be spent drawing and conducting individual meetings.

Course number: ART-373
Prerequisite: n/a

Costume & Design

3

Art and fashion have been closely related for a long time and have grown ever closer in the modern era. It appears that in the 21st century the speed and frequency with which ideas flow between the two areas is accelerating, some clear evidence of which is Karl Lagerfeld's Spring 2014 show at the Grand Palais based on contemporary art references, a similar contemporaneous show in Milano from Miuccia Prada and collaborations between Raf Simons and Sterling Ruby). The common view of the art/fashion nexus is that the flow between the two is mainly uni-directional, that fashion draws freely on (sometimes illicitly appropriating) fine art and incorporates it into fashion garments in ways ranging from oblique references to near-exact reproductions. This view, however, is inaccurate: Though not as obvious, usually indirect and with specific examples less easy to cite, the flow of ideas and information from fashion to fine art is substantive and important. Fine art is not created in temporal and cultural isolation chambers: artists operate from within historical/geographical/cultural contexts and contribute to and are located within a 'visual' zeitgeist (to use Hegel's term). Nowadays the visual zeitgeist in which artists operate is a veritable universe composed of innumerable pieces of visual data relating to color, shape, pattern, scale, cultural references and more, with an ever-shifting geography of trends, preferences, hierarchies, innovations and terminations. This zeitgeist, though, is created not just by the output of artists but by the output of designers, of all types, all of whom are constantly making choices related to those visual variables: it is in fact an 'art/design zeitgeist'. Fashion is perhaps the single largest area of design, and certainly the area that directly affects most people; it is arguably therefore the most important of the design fields. By the nature of its product it is also the most dynamic area of design, in a constant state of innovation and flux, with an accelerated rate of turnover. Its contribution to the 'art/design zeitgeist' in every aspect, is enormous and its influence on all the other areas of design and on fine art is constant and deep. It is important for students of fine art to understand the connections between their own discipline and that of design, specifically fashion design, through the commonality of the same 'art/design zeitgeist'. A course on this topic should include sessions reviewing specific examples, historical and contemporary, of the art/fashion nexus, operating in both directions, as well as, perhaps, an overview of some of the related philosophical writings on the subject. Class assignments could include creation of fine art and/or fashion garments displaying influence from the other discipline. On a practical note, fashion designers are increasingly looking to recruit new employees with a background in fine art, finding that artists' creative instincts often give rise to original ideas that can effectively incorporated into new garment designs. This course could give fine art majors an insight into an alternative outlet for their training and skills.

Course number: ART-342
Prerequisite: Take FAR-204/ART-204, Art: Structure & Systems

Dandelion + Mushrooms

3

DANDELION + MUSHROOMS: A RADICAL LABORATORY is a course that explores art as a holistic practice, one that fosters day-dreaming, wandering, wondering, playing, questioning, collecting, cultivating, and building new ways of making art and becoming well in (and with) the world. Together we will discover and share modes of building resilience by becoming more attuned to the very systems (neo-liberal conditions) that hold us back, do not include us, or, worse, traumatize and oppress us. By becoming aware, we can begin the process of navigating the what-is-already-out-there and the materiality needed to make way for sustainable and flourishing lives. To do this, we have to get as radical as dandelions and mushrooms - two critical detoxifiers and generators of information, each with its intelligent system of healing others and connecting across species. What can dandelions and mushrooms teach us? They can show us how we exist in whole systems AND, more so, how we can and must thrive not despite but because of the crisis-capitalism that is depriving us of sustainable lives. It is vital that artists understand solidarity economics - what it is and how we can build new ways of supporting each other. How can we become better Eco-materialists? What are the implications of being an artist, and how can we use that to develop new ways of being for us and other communities, human or otherwise. In short, DANDELION + MUSHROOMS: A RADICAL LABORATORY is a class in world-building through art-making and the new paradigms that await our attention; they are out there. This course is an inquiry into alternative, sustainable, and expansive forms of art production and being. Students create new or build upon existing work (either independently or collaboratively) and find empowering ways to share and show their work. It is important to note that this class is a collective lab where students decide the paths of the course, the goals to be accomplished, shape the interests at hand, and determine how to take charge of their art and lives. Come prepared to get radical.

Course number: ART-318
Prerequisite: n/a

Deviant Practices

3

This studio class is designed to address a problem we all have, throughout our lives as artists: the rut. We become complacent about our art work, the routines we have in the studio, our usual relationship to our ideas and our materials. It's useful to shake ourselves up, do something that seems opposed to our usual paths. This course works as an exorcism for the same-old, same-old. Through projects, discussions of art, films and literature, we will challenge you to question ideas of mistakes or wrong turns and to explore how notions of good and bad are formed in art making. We'll push you to divert from any style or formula that your work might have taken, to follow paths that you may be neglecting in the creative process. Come make "bad art" with us!

Course number: ART-232
Prerequisite: n/a

Digital Casting

3

In this studio, students will be introduced to creative methods of 3D modeling from downloading, ripping, scanning, to constructing. Through this process, we will explore ready-made warehouses, social media filters, and narrative game worlds. Together, we will learn about the medium's unique affordances through hands-on research, in-class workshops, thematic readings, and formal discussions of contemporary applications and implications. The studio offers an open space for creative consideration, examination, and interpretation of the 3D model. Projects can be completed as individuals or in groups, however all students will be asked to consider how the digital volume, from creation to exhibition, applies to their existing studio practice. No previous experiencein 3D modeling software required.

Course number: TDS-326B
Prerequisite: n/a

Drawing 1

3

Drawing 1 explores the role of contemporary Fine Art in the form of drawing projects with lectures on a range of subjects and procedures pertinent to drawing. The basic learning objectives for Drawing 1 will focus on developing & maintaining a sketch book; understanding the difference between drawing from direct observation and drawing from photography; exploring the differences between abstraction and nonobjective drawing, as well as, creating drawings as site-specific projects.

Course number: ART-171
Prerequisite: n/a

Expanded Drawing

3

The lines of a drawing are driven by a myriad of hand-hewn pathways. Directions are not immediately clear, but through inquisition and exploration, we are able to trail blaze new and extraordinary images to fill our frames. Building from the fundamental techniques developed in Drawing 1, Expanded Drawing: Purpose and Play offers students the time and space needed to sweeten their drawing field of view. Through thematic prompts, propellant projects, and constructive critiques, we will make direct contact with our intentions and reignite the magic of visual formulation within ourselves. "What am I doing and why am I doing it?" This studio course cultivates individual and collaborative solutions necessary to elicit an enthusiastic reconnection with mark-making.

Course number: ART-237
Prerequisite: n/a

Experimental Animation

3

This course will take the history of animation as a starting point for an investigation into non-indexical or non-photographic moving images and the expanded field of digital media in the 21st century. The relationship between animation and film is complex; although animation is the older art form it has often been assigned a secondary status in the history of moving images. The rise of digital animation processes and the large scale abandonment of analog film recording in the late 20th and early 21st centuries has caused a rethinking of the relationship between film and animation. The digital, non-indexical image has modified the way we perceive the photographic, and animation has pervaded and superseded film. We will alternate between reading and writing, in-class discussion, technical demonstrations and critique. Demos will include digital compositing, strategies of appropriation, collage and animation, using Adobe After Effects and non-linear video editing software (Final Cut Pro or Adobe Premier.) Early in the term, students will be responsible for completing two short, moving-image projects, and by the end of the course each student will present a completed animation project. Readings will cover both the early history of animation and proto-cinema, as well as texts by contemporary thinkers and artists on the subject of digitality and circulationism.

Course number: ART-372
Prerequisite: n/a

Fiber Art

3

An intensive skills class to cover basics in crochet, knitting, macrame, and frame-loom weaving. This class is an introduction to a range of techniques associated with fiber arts. Through readings and discussions students will learn how artists who work with fiber address issues around process and material, as well as ideas around labor, value, sexual politics, and political activism. In addition to hands-on learning, there will be class discussions around reading materials from the curators, artists, and academics on various aspects of fiber art.

Course number: ART-315
Prerequisite: n/a

Field

3

FIELD is a class that utilizes field trips to explore ideas of site in its meaning for those that live in the Los Angeles area past, present and future. This class cultivates a keen awareness of the contextualization of site as investigation, enjoyment, content source and responsibility within the metropolitan area of Los Angeles County. This class welcomes the articulation and practice of all kinds of art media within student's art practice. Through direct experience, students will visit 5 distinct and geographically separate neighborhoods to learn about both their historical roles in the fabric of Los Angeles as aesthetic muse and source of intellectual engagement. Los Angeles is a site in which significant cultural capital is produced, shared within, and exported from these areas. Modes of transport, cell phone will be needed (and masks worn in a COVID aware socially distanced class) when we meet at each outdoor location. Here we will generate art through participating in physical, visual, spatial, spiritual, intellectual and sensual connections that we access through our various spatial movements. Since "Field" is excursion oriented it meets for a full day 9:00am-6pm, weeks 1-8 . This course consists of independently directed art-making. It, therefore, adapts to the individual student's needs and can be taken every summer term without repeating course content.

Course number: ART-296
Prerequisite: n/a

From 2D to 3D: Intro to CnC

3

FROM 2D TO 3D: Intro To CnC This course is an introduction to the basic skills of CnC technology, with an emphasis on the integration of these skills into a variety of art studio practices. Students will learn how to translate ideas from sketches to simple CAD drawings on accessible programs like Illustrator and Sketchup, and then see them come to fruition by carving them on the class small scale CnC cutter. Students will also be introduced to a variety of artists who utilize these skills in their work in inventive ways.

Course number: ART-140
Prerequisite: n/a

Historical Abyss

3

The Historical Abyss - Daniel Small History is always being imaginatively figured as it is seemingly figured out. This course will proceed from the notion that history is not written from the certitude of concrete facts, but rather in the productive unreliability of lived and invested memories, myths, ideologies, stories, and dreams. It will also seek to recognize that these errors, myths, and confabulations lead us through and beyond facts to their meanings and that the dubious reliability of such wrong tales enhance their historical value in that they allow us to recognize the objectives of the tellers and the intentions and desires behind them. Topics of discussion include: art forgeries, abandoned film sets, theme parks, and casino designs. Through a triangulation of past, present, and possible future, the synthesis of these sites and objects will be examined for potentially constituting more authentic versions of the histories they seemingly approximate. The course will take on a myriad of forms, including lectures and discussions with diverse specialists, for example FBI Agents, Curators, and Artists.

Course number: ART-343
Prerequisite: n/a

Home Studio Workshops

0

Home Studio Workshops is a response to our current moment. In light of our new circumstances -- limitations on space, the necessity of fabrication and conversation -- much of what we have taken for granted must be re-thought. How can you better document your work - lighting, digital tools? How can you make the best visual argument for your work "without" compromising the integrity of your work. What processes or ideas would you like to learn to keep the development of your work at home creative? The information shared and demonstrated in Home Studio Workshops will be practical in nature. Everyone artist has specific ways in which they work and these workshops will respond to directly to questions and concerns you have about representing, making, presenting your work in the best manner possible with tools already at hand. From a DIY sensibility to digital design, Home Studio Workshops can help you neutralize the playing field to your advantage. HSW will meet via ZOOM in group and with individualized problem-solving sessions.

Course number: ART-201
Prerequisite: n/a

Image & Consequence

3

This course will provide a platform for students who are looking to develop, expand, or hope to locate a critical conversation that links image discourse to systemic societal issues within their studio practice. Course activities includes lectures, group research projects, student led discussions, field trips, and adaptive studio projects followed by critiques. "We currently live in an era of declaration - US vs. THEM mentality. Our information media platforms are getting less polite, and societies' image of cultural correctness is being challenged and redefined through dominant and subdominant media sources. As people's inherited and informed opinions manifest into media-based experiences, these gestures are systemically affecting how people consequentially and psychologically experience the world - especially when opposing value systems collide. Through research and studio projects, this course will provide a platform for students to develop a critical conversation around societal issues that links the image to the human experience as separate and connected, foreground and background, or compassionately as positive and negative forces that shapes the self in relation to others."

Course number: ART-363
Prerequisite: n/a

Installation 1

3

This class investigates everything outside the gallery, starting with the history of landscape painting. The relationship of site to the viewer is examined with regards to gardens, earthworks and performance. Issues of context and collaboration are explored through a curated show of site specific works.

Course number: ART-231
Prerequisite: Take ART-101, Re-thinking Art

Intro to Fiber Arts

3

Intro to Fiber Arts This intensive skills-based course will introduce you to a range of techniques associated with fiber arts, including the basics of crochet, knitting, frame-loom weaving, natural dyeing, and hand- and machine-sewing. Through readings and discussions, you will learn how artists who work with fiber address issues around process and material, as well as ideas around labor, value, sexual politics, political activism, and consider the ever-shifting relationship between craft and art. In addition to hands-on learning, there will be class discussions around reading materials from curators, artists, and academics on various aspects of fiber art. Estimated cost of supplies: $100 (minimum). No prerequisite.

Course number: ART-416
Prerequisite: n/a

Intro to Printmaking

3

This course introduces students to monoprint techniques, including wood block carving and printing, line egching, drypoint, and aquatint. High standards of craftsmanship, drawing, and the fundamentals of specific techniques are emphasized.

Course number: ART-251
Prerequisite: n/a

Investigative Aesthetics

3

Investigative Aesthetics addresses various practices at the intersection of contemporary art and investigative journalism. Based on the tenets of the independent research agency Forensic Architecture based at Goldsmiths University of London the course will seek to move beyond contouring or critiquing histories from a distance and aim to come up with strategies that intervene and produce evidence that result in new kinds of information and knowledge. Forensic Architecture consists of a multidisciplinary team that employ counter forensics that turn the forensic gaze onto investigations of state agencies and dominant narratives. Their evidence is presented in political and legal forums, truth commissions, courts, and human rights reports, and we will focus on using this model as a means to investigate issues that are usually discussed in contemporary art practice, but rarely addressed with this intensity or rigor. Collectively we will seek to find working methodologies for engaging and addressing the complexities of local and international crisis related to human rights and ecocide and will focus on how to intervene and take a stake in historical outcomes that are being sorted out in the present. The class will also consider how the evidence gathered in this investigative practice can have a hybridized function as art objects by finding new contexts and ways in which they can be considered. The architecture of memory will be of specific importance and the collection and dissemination of oral histories, first-hand witness testimony, and material witness analysis will help to provide starting points for further investigation in student-initiated investigations. Some practices we will consider are individuals that are redefining what research-based art could entail and who are working through direct engagement with their subjects such as: Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Susan Schuppli, Hiwa K, Gala Porras Kim, Jill Magid, Sidsel Meineche Hansen, Shadi Habib Allah, Renee Green, Taryn Simon, Pierre Huyghe, and Sean Raspet. Research through field work and investigatory studio practice will proceed after initial critiques to assess and address issues interwoven into student work. Discussions will be tailored to efforts that give an overview of organizations, funding, media partnerships, and other meaningful connections that will be crucial in carrying out research and implementation on a case basis. The final will consist of a presentation that could be the exhibition of research, evidence, art works, performances, or a combination thereof, but could also consist of off-site works or collaborations whether with other students in the class, local or international organizations, or individuals yet to be identified. Highly recommended for Upper Term students.

Course number: ART-288
Prerequisite: n/a

Like: a Competition

3

What does it mean to "like" something? 'Like' is a ubiquitous, bandied-about word in contemporary society: it's usually a declarative, democratic, and safe way to express an opinion. We often share our aesthetic interests by publicly saying what we like. In an attempt to up-the-ante and make us more committed to the things we like, this course will give us tools to defend our own pleasures, desires, and fantasies, and to make what we like have consequences. We'll think of art and design as a competition --- not just a job, success or money --- but for the hears and minds of audiences. "LIKE: a competition" will address personal and cultural formations of taste and beauty and will look at strategies for describing the creative process in a world of subjective preference. We will deal with a variety of subjects, including the correlation between music and visual culture and the visual-historical moments in art that signal aesthetic shifts in societal thinking. We will examine the history of political and artistic manifestos as fundamental ways in which people transform their theories into action. Students will critically examine the apogees and pitfalls of political theory and aesthetic dogma, and maybe have the opportunity to write an aesthetic manifesto of their own. This is a transdisciplinary discussion and project-based course that attempts to place the humanities deep within art and design practices. It questions the distinction of theory from practice and thinking from doing. As such, participants will receive both studio and academic credit. (3 units of H&S Critical Thinking)

Course number: HCRT-368
Prerequisite: Take TDS-368

Materials of Art & Design

3

This foundation level class is dedicated to enhancing the student's understanding of the inherent characteristics of a variety of materials in order to explore their best applications for art or design projects. For this reason, assignments are experimental in an effort to discover innovative solutions to the development of form, structure and texture. Materials may include wood, plastics, plaster, metal and paper. Students broaden their understanding of creative problem-solving, originality, and analysis of visual information. Material covered includes the safe operation of woodworking and some metal-working machines, as well as techniques of mold-making, and material safety.

Course number: ART-158
Prerequisite: Take FND/INT-102 Design 1 or INT-103

New Media Arts

3

This course examines the relationship of art to new digital media. Various aspects of new media such as the world wide web will be used to research and generate artist projects. Topics such as interactivity, digital sculpture, and time based arts will be explored.

Course number: ART-287
Prerequisite: n/a

Occupy the Monitors

3

Occupy the Monitors All over campus, flat screen monitors silently stream useful information-upcoming events, student award-winners, CSE activities and the like-more than a dozen networked monitors all doing what they were designed to do: communicate event information. In this course, we will use these monitors as a venue for exhibiting original works and calling attention to things we care about. Solo and collaborative projects, as digital stills and silent videos, will be screened on these school monitors throughout the term. Some projects will in inserted among the usual flow, while others will take over the monitors completely for a day or more. Class time will be split between the production, exhibition and critique of original student work and the exploration of historical precedents relevant to our project, exploring practices that "occupy" sites not normally intended for an encounter with art, disrupt the dominant visual economy, or meet their audience in a range of unexpected places, from inside a gallerist's ear to outside the earth's atmosphere.

Course number: ART-272
Prerequisite: n/a

One on One A

1

In order to address our students educational and creative needs, we have revamped One on One by assigning all lower term Fine Art students to core faculty advisors to meet four times (for thirty minutes each) a term to discuss issues ranging from curriculum development to their educational experience. One on One should is required and should be taken terms one (105), two (205), and three (305). Students can select a single core faculty member with whom they want to meet. The faculty will be responsible for monitoring your progress through the fine art program. Individual meeting will be arranged between the student and faculty.

Course number: ART-105
Prerequisite: n/a

One on One B

1

In order to address our students educational and creative needs, we have revamped One on One by assigning all lower term Fine Art students to core faculty advisors to meet four times (for thirty minutes each) a term to discuss issues ranging from curriculum development to their educational experience. One on One should is required and should be taken terms one (105), two (205), and three (305). Students can select a single core faculty member with whom they want to meet. The faculty will be responsible for monitoring your progress through the fine art program. Individual meeting will be arranged between the student and faculty.

Course number: ART-205
Prerequisite: Take ART-105, One on One A

One on One C

1

In order to address our students educational and creative needs, we have revamped One on One by assigning all lower term Fine Art students to core faculty advisors to meet four times (for thirty minutes each) a term to discuss issues ranging from curriculum development to their educational experience. One on One should is required and should be taken terms one (105), two (205), and three (305). Students can select a single core faculty member with whom they want to meet. The faculty will be responsible for monitoring your progress through the fine art program. Individual meeting will be arranged between the student and faculty.

Course number: ART-305
Prerequisite: Take Art-205, One on One B

Open Crit

3

Open Crit class provides students with an opportunity for more in-depth discussion about their work in a group critique environment. Open Crit is open to all students working in all mediums and media. The dynamics of Open Crit is unique, because it will be coordinated by a Fine Art Graduate student and Undergraduate Eighth-Term Fine Art student, offering a peer-to-peer evaluation and discussion about current student work across all terms.

Course number: ART-353
Prerequisite: Take ART-101, Re-Thinking Art

Openings

1

Openings is a course run by Grad Art and Undergrad Fine Art. It is a one credit unit, student-led class that explores the Los Angeles art scene. There will be six meetings over the course of the 14-week term where students from both departments attend the latest gallery and museum exhibitions across LA. Students, with the help of the Grad TA, will decide what exhibitions to see. Class runs on Saturday afternoons. Credit fulfillment is based on attendance and engagement (specifics of requirements are decided by the group.)

Course number: ART-222
Prerequisite: n/a

Painting 1

3

This introductory class provides a rigorous introduction to both technical and formal problems in painting. Emphasis is placed on understanding the fundamentals of the painter's craft through a range of available materials; including pigments and paints, structures, surfaces and grounds, brushes and tools, varnishes and preservation strategies. Students will have the opportunity to explore a variety of mediums. Subject matter is explored through traditional painting genres of still life, landscape, figure and portrait, symbol and allegory.

Course number: ART-111
Prerequisite: n/a

Painting:Materials&Techniques

3

What is painting now? This course examines opportunities for painting inthe 21st Century - looking at how artists make work now. With a focus on acrylic paint, this class offers a comprehensive understanding of both traditional and contemporary methods and materials used in painting. It provides a basic knowledge of application tools and brushes, preparation of grounds and surfaces, color and pigments, painting mediums and preservation strategies.Through an examination of both the process and effects of painting, including demonstrations and exercises, students learn to how to analyze and execute various painting techniques while developing an awareness of contemporary painting strategies.

Course number: ART-261
Prerequisite: n/a

Performance

3

Over the course of the term, students will think about the role of performance art as an extension of daily experience and gain a better understanding what it means to use their body, identity and personal experiences as a tool in an artistic practice. They will produce their own unique vocabulary of actions, gestures and movements as it pertains to performance. Through readings, lectures and extensive in-class and out-of-class assignments, students will focus upon removing notions of success, talent and failure.

Course number: ART-320
Prerequisite: n/a

Picturing the Now

3

This class will function as a sort of workshop for thinking through contemporary ethical questions around such things as rights and access to public spaces and institutions, ownership of images and representation, funding and adjudicating structures within art institutions; diversity and accessibility in representation and production, censorship, etc. We will work at developing a language and a skill for critical evaluation of ethical questions with the expressed goal of building this lens into our production, participation and viewership as artists. This course will approach the topic of ethics as a dynamic practice that demands constant engagement and re-evaluation both inside and out of the studio. This begins with the recognition that while work may be made in private, the exhibition, reception and sale of work is fundamentally a public act that necessitates a separation of intention from outcome, and a fluency in interpretation and contextualization alongside the development of craft. Subjects such as the current uprisings against racial, gender and sexual injustice; the COVID-19 pandemic; historical imperatives in representation; codes of ethics; political and artist manifestos; copyright laws and legal cases brought by and against artists; and historical instances of censorship, defacement and boycott of art works and monuments will be treated as test-cases that reveal or point to the underlying values and assumptions of their producers.

Course number: ART-244
Prerequisite: n/a

Portrait REcon

3

Portrait Reconsidered will consider the form of the portrait: its history, what it means to us and to culture in the past and the present. We will explore the portrait in every possible formation, across all mediums (including literature and film,) developing our ability to make and consider the portrait in context. The class may include lectures, student lead discussion,in-class projects, field trips, and visiting artists.

Course number: TDS-342A
Prerequisite: n/a

Post Re-Thinking Art

3

Post Rethinking Art is a studio-seminar for advanced undergraduate students working in all mediums. The purpose of the class is to provide ample studio time for students to develop their individual studio projects in an open studio/seminar environment under faculty guidance. The studio aspect of the class will be enhanced by intensive weekly group critiques of new work or works-in-progress. Post Rethinking Art is a prerequisite for ART-451, Senior Projects 1.

Course number: ART-401
Prerequisite: Take ART-300, 5th Term Review

Printmaking

3

This course introduces the basics of lithography and photographic printing processes. Manipulation of inks, media, types of print papers, and technical mastery are emphasized.

Course number: ART-252
Prerequisite: n/a

Projects

3

Projects is a course in which students propose, develop, and produce a new self-directed project. Students work independently and within small groups under the guidance fine art department faculty and are provided skill-based learning as needed for each project. This course consists of independently directed art-making. It, therefore, adapts to the individual student's needs and can be taken every summer term without repeating course content. As part of the Fine Art Summer Program, Projects is taught as an 8-week studio with 6-week self-study.

Course number: ART-298
Prerequisite: n/a

Re-Thinking Art

3

This course expands student awareness of contempory art activity through a selective examination of modern and post-modern values. Related projects explore critical issues in diverse mediums.

Course number: ART-101
Prerequisite: n/a

Realisms

3

REALISMS: Representational Strategies in Contemporary Painting The course will examine the historical trajectory of Realism in painting as a political form. Taking as its starting point Linda Nochlin's 1973 essay The Realist Criminal and Abstract Law, our research will follow the historically intellectualized and politicized opposition between Realism and Anti-realism. Through a selection of readings we will investigate a plurality of stylistic strategies (Realisms), from primitivism, surrealism, social realism, cubism, and hyper-realism, that align visually disparate languages of representation as discursive working models of opposition. The studio aspect will unfold through projects that will address the meta-tropes of Realist painting - Still-Life, Figure, and Landscape - through the lens of criticality. Students will be asked to make works that claim a point of view that aligns their personal artistic relationship with Realism and Representation within the parameters and goals of the above formats. Supplemental discussions and lectures on artists, techniques, and processes, will assist in contextualizing relevant contemporary practices that use historical genre, representation, and Realism to address relevant current topics, social issues, and identitie

Course number: ART-313
Prerequisite: Take FAR-101/ART-101, Re-Thinking Art

Sci-Fi

3

Sci-Fi is a TDS that will explore the cultural manifestations of Science Fiction. Utopias, distopias, aliens, galactic colonization, time travel, alternate realities: imagining the future has everything to do with the present. We will read, write, talk, watch films and make art about this.

Course number: TDS-383
Prerequisite: n/a

Sculpture 1

3

Sculpture 1 is an introductory sculpture class is comprised from a selection of diverse concepts, materials and processes that are associated with the subject of contemporary sculpture. This class is for the student who wishes to explore other methods of art production and to expand their conceptual development, as well as technical skills, and awareness of contemporary sculpture. We will discuss a wide range of ideas that pertain to sculpture, its history and status as: object, materials, process, craft, space, the temporal, and the experiential. You will be required to complete projects along with several homework assignments. The materials and processes we will focus on are: wood, steel, plaster, sheet metal, and plexi-glass. Other materials such as fiberglass, clay, fabric, found objects, etc. and other media are also available for any of the projects. Each project will be guided in regard to the required materials (wood, steel, plastic) but will allow for an expanded application of craft, spatial exploration, and conceptual issues. The idea of this class is to engage you with the subject of sculpture for the entire term and to use the full range of facilities that are available here at Art Center. Think of the College shops and labs as your workspaces and as an extension of this classroom. The shops are staffed with highly skilled technicians who are available to assist you with the technical aspects of your projects. The class discussions will play a crucial role in contextualizing the students' projects.

Course number: ART-162
Prerequisite: n/a

Seminar

3

Seminar is a course where students from our studio classes come together one day a week to show work, engage in peer-to-peer dialogues, and simultaneously examine what the studio critique is. Seminar is also a course in community-building with fellow artists. This course consists of independently directed art-making. It, therefore, adapts to the individual student's needs and can be taken every summer term without repeating course content. As part of the Fine Art Summer Program, Seminar is taught as an 8-week studio with 6-week self-study.

Course number: ART-381A
Prerequisite: n/a

Seminar B

3

"Seminar" is the lynch pin class of the Summer term. It is premised on the programming that occurs in artist residencies and graduate art program where artists come together to build discussions around artists' work. In this course, students gather in the morning for visiting artist talks and discussions and, in the afternoon, gather for a group discussions to their peers' work. This is primarily a student-led discussion class with facilitation by two faculty members. Each student can expect to have at least one critique over the course of eight weeks. "Seminar B" can also be taken as a separate class (3 credit units) if you are enrolled in printmaking or any of the ART "gatepost" courses (Art Structures+Systems, 5th Term Review, Post Re-thinking and Senior Projects 1 and 2). Chair petition is required. "Seminar B" is scheduled from 9:00am-3:50pm weeks 1-8. Weeks 9-14 are independent investigations culminating in an exhibition at 870 week 13.

Course number: ART-382B
Prerequisite: n/a

Senior Projects 1

3

Senior Projects 1 is the first class in a two-term course series that culminates the experience of the fine art major and addresses relevant issues in preparation for a life in art after graduation. Seventh term students will each present a group exhibition (or individual shows when schedule permits) as preparation for their senior exhibition the following term. SP 1 students will also be required to act as a crit leader for one of the Senior Projects' shows, participate in the class, write a one-page response essay to each SP1 and SP2 show, and complete a full draft of their Senior Thesis essay.

Course number: ART-451
Prerequisite: Take ART-451L, Senior Projects Thesis 1 Take ART-300, 5th Term Review

Senior Projects 2

3

Senior Projects 2 is the second class in this two-term course. It is a culmination of the student's experience as a fine art major and addresses relevant issues in preparation for a life in art after graduation. Graduating students develop a cohesive body of individual work for their senior exhibition in the undergraduate gallery. SP2 students will also be required: to act as a crit leader for one of the Senior Projects' shows; participate in the class; write a one-page response essay to each SP1 and SP2 show; and write a final draft of their Senior Thesis essay.

Course number: ART-452
Prerequisite: Take ART-401, Post Rethinking Art -AND- Take ART-452L, Senior Projects Thesis 2 ART-451, Senior Projects 1

Senior Projects Thesis 1

0

Over the two terms of Senior Projects, students develop and complete a 7-10 page thesis about their work. Through a series of workshops and individual meetings, students work with a faculty thesis advisor to develop their writing. By the end of Senior Projects One, students submit a draft of their thesis and by the end of Senior Projects Two, a final draft. The theses are then discussed with their classmates and faculty in an end-of-term roundtable. Ultimately, through writing a thesis, students not only gain further insight into their work but build the confidence needed to take their art practice out into the world. Senior Projects Thesis 1 is a co-requisite class to be taken with ART 451 Senior Projects 1.

Course number: ART-451L
Prerequisite: Take ART-451, Senior Projects 1

Senior Projects Thesis 2

0

Over the two terms of Senior Projects, students develop and complete a 7-10 page thesis about their work. Through a series of workshops and individual meetings, students work with a faculty thesis advisor to develop their writing. By the end of Senior Projects One, students submit a draft of their thesis and by the end of Senior Projects Two, a final draft. The theses are then discussed with their classmates and faculty in an end-of-term roundtable. Ultimately, through writing a thesis, students not only gain further insight into their work but build the confidence needed to take their art practice out into the world. Senior Projects Thesis 2 is a co-requisite class to be taken with ART 452 Senior Projects 2

Course number: ART-452L
Prerequisite: Take ART-452, Senior Projects 2 Take ART-451, Senior Projects 1 AND ART-451L, Senior Projects Thesis 1

Social Critique

3

Part studio class, part academic seminar, Social Critique takes a sobering look at our present world. Crashing through the cliches and inspirational messaging of today's "change agents," the seminar section focuses on the social, political, and economic forces eroding democracy and consolidating oligarchic powers around the world. Topics include the parallels between the present and the Gilded Age; the anti-sociality of social media; the psychic conditions of post-futurity and neo-feudalism, and the neo-liberal global economy of precarity. The studio section of the class explores cases of critical art-making from the recent past. The cases range across media: performance art; art in public spaces and sculptural objects; body art; film/video/TV; social media; posters; graphics and multiples; architecture and furniture design, as well as painting and drawing. Students will be expected to write bi-weekly short papers in response to the assigned readings and artworks shared in class. Students will submit a final assignment, which can be either an art project or a research paper.

Course number: TDS-349A
Prerequisite: n/a

Social Practice 1

3

Social Practice 1 will look at the history and approaches artists are developing in using the real world as an expressive and ideological medium. The engagement in stories, conversations, and histories is how we make sense, how we remember, articulate/re-articulate, our experiences, memories, and fantasies. By talking with, collecting, recording, and engaging with others in the community, we become agents of change and transformation. In this class we will develop and work on projects that help us understand the roles of social narratives. We will also discuss films, video art, and contemporary film and art theory that explore the relationship of the self to the Other and embody a spirit of resistance. Radical forms will be used to investigate roles of gender, multi-culturism as well as positions of difference, opposition and empathy. Social Practice 1 is a fine art studio class.

Course number: ART-242
Prerequisite: Take ART-101, Re-Thinking Art

Socially Engaged Art

3

Socially Engaged Art is a class that will provide a more focused and committed look at socially engaged art as a discipline by participating in collaboration with ECF artists. ACCD is fortunate to have the opportunity to work with the adult artists that are clients at ECF to produce an art project reflecting their interests and understanding of their gender and sexuality using video, sound or performance. The artists that come to the ECF art center are developmentally challenged and many have lived under the structure of institutional care and structure most of their life. Art Center students will be matched with an individual artist and get to know them at their art center in Downtown Los Angeles. After meetings and even a field trip of your choice, financial support is provided from the Pickford foundation to the Art Center student to produce a project and participate in production of support materials in dialog with their ECF artist for exhibition at their gallery. The actual process of collaboration is one we will study and research as it is pivotal to the field of social practice. The finished product and its aesthetic is up to the Art Center student to determine in this process. All these concerns will be in conversation with the variety of community based collaborative structures and ethics that we learn about in class. Through reading, writing about and looking closely at other projects in the world, and finally through practice, we will discuss and understand our role in socially engaged art at this socio/political time in this class. A preliminary visit to ECF to be arranged by faculty and/or attendance in Social Practice1 is a prerequisite for this class. Participation in the ECF exhibition, and production of material for their website and publication is a requirement.

Course number: TDS-349
Prerequisite: n/a

Sound

3

Sound is a Fine Art studio course focusing on the subject of sound and its relationship to Fine Art practices including the gallery and public arts. The course will expose students to a brief survey of the sonic history, technological advancements, related discourse, and current practices that artists have developed to incorporate sound as a Fine Art practice. Class time includes hands on practices in the sound lab, working with sound in all capacities, such as records, CD, mp3, cassettes, live performance, as well as an introduction to the ways in which sound can be recorded, edited, and manipulated digitally. Course presentations include demonstrating how the use of sound has been incorporated with other practices such as sculpture, performance, social practice, and installation.

Course number: ART-281
Prerequisite: n/a

Sound Design

3

This class addresses basic concepts of sound, acoustics, sound design, sonic relationships and Sound Art. Emphasis will be placed on learning practical techniques to create to create original stand-alone. sound projects, and sound for video. Topics include : Basic acoustics; the physics of sound; frequency partitions. Sound perceptions and human orientation; listening; sound characteristics. Recording Tools and techniques. "Cleaning-up" sound and field recordings. Really listening. Sound Art: a survey.

Course number: ART-382
Prerequisite: n/a

Studio Lab

0

Reserved studio time for Fine Art students in terms 1-3.

Course number: ART-203
Prerequisite: n/a

Studio Practice

3

Studio Practice introduces students to a series of practical materials, processes, methods and studio engagements that are associated with developing and maintaining a studio-based art practice. Students also explore expanded applications of the terms 'studio' and 'practice'. This course is a pre-requisite for ART-204, Art Structures and Systems.

Course number: ART-202
Prerequisite: Take Art-101, Re-Thinking Art

Studio Visits

3

Working artists in and around Los Angeles open their studios and allow students to witness the activity of art fabrication while engaging in critical dialogue about the content of the work.

Course number: ART-325
Prerequisite: ART-204/FAR-204 Art: Structure and Systems

Summer Studio

3

"Summer Studio" centers on the individual student experience and the development of their work as an independently motivated practice. Students are provided time and attention to create a new work. In addition to cultivating and furthering one's studio practice, students meet weekly for individual meetings with faculty as well as for directed group discussions and facilitated peer reviews. This course consists of independently directed art-making. It, therefore, adapts to the individual student's needs and can be taken every summer term without repeating course content. The Process: On the morning of the first class, students and faculty meet as a group to discuss and layout each person's plan for the works they will produce over eight weeks. For lower term students (terms 2-4), this means creating new work. For upper term students creating a body of work and/or building upon prior work. Lower term students are guided in the development of their art through class meetings and individual studio visits with faculty. Upper term students have weekly one-on-one meetings with faculty to discuss the progress of their work. As part of the Fine Art Summer Program, "Summer Studio" is scheduled as class interaction weeks 1-8 with weeks 9-14 for self-study investigations.

Course number: ART-347
Prerequisite: n/a

The Art of Things

3

How can the materials that construct an artwork support our goals for its content? This question will be put to task in this class, which asks students to align materials and their meanings socially, historically and through metaphor and symbolism. As a staring point this course will act as an introduction to the ideas of Structuralism, its roots in Modernism, and examine ways to expand on the movement's strategies and models of representation. In doing so we will explore ways to align and appropriate historical tactics to make works dealing with contemporary issues, with a focus on identity, and politics. Through a series of projects, students will gain insight into the possibilities of using structuralist methodologies beginning with using only the constituent materials of painting -the support, canvas, and paint- and expanding toward more non-traditional materials. Experiments with additive, subtractive, and negational approaches to constructing paintings will consider the form as both object and image. Supplemental discussions and lectures on artists, techniques, and processes, will assist in contextualizing relevant contemporary practices that use this historical movement to address relevant current topics,social issues, and identities.

Course number: ART-316
Prerequisite: n/a

Undergraduate/Graduate Seminar

3

The Undergraduate/Graduate Art Seminar offers advanced Fine Art degree students an opportunity to participate in the AGA-554 Graduate Art seminar. Enrollment is granted by petition through the Fine Art Undergraduate Chair. "AGA-554 "Graduate Art Seminar". This course is a visiting lecture series held weekly in the evening in conjunction with the Graduate Fine Art program. Guests include internationally recognized artists, critics, art historians, architects, filmmakers, writers from Los Angles and around the globe." Students enrolled in this class will be required to attend all lectures plus have strong reading and writing skills.

Course number: ART-454
Prerequisite: Take FAR-402/ART-451, Senior Projects 1

Video 1

3

Video 1 is a creative and critical exploration into the moving image in art and culture. As an introductory course, students learn basic skills of shooting and editing as well as the physical and structural elements in the development and construction of moving image projects. Students build their understanding of contemporary video by investigating historical precedences in film, art and culture, as well as delving into socio-political content, and inter-subjective relations at play in moving image works. Students expand their creative practice through the exploration and production of three video-based projects over the term.

Course number: ART-271
Prerequisite: n/a

Visiting Artist Program

3

Visiting Artist Program provides our students the opportunity to access new perspectives and new information by granting them adjacency to different points-of-view through visiting artist lectures and studio visits. Visiting Artist Program is required once, but may be taken a second time as an elective, allowing students to have multiple opportunities to work with outside artists.

Course number: ART-221
Prerequisite: n/a

Visiting Artist Workshop

3

Intermediate and upper term workshop, taught by a different Visiting Artist each term, focusing on art issues that have fueled each artist's respective studio practice. Martin Kersels, Liz Larner, Jason Rhodes, Lyle Ashton Harris, Jennifer Pastor, Richard Hawkins, Toba Khedoori, Sam Durant, Amy Adler and Jim Shaw are recent visiting artists. Topics have included: autobiography and representation - constructions of the self; enigmas of race; the art of autobiography and lying; the body as metaphor; form and context.

Course number: ART-351
Prerequisite: Take FAR-101/ART-101, Re-Thinking Art

Walls: Public Art and Culture

2

Indonesia is the largest island country in the world. The country's 17,000 islands support one of the world's highest levels of biodiversity, and are home to over 400 ethnic groups representing many languages, religions and cultures. The US has the third largest population of Indonesians living outside of Indonesia, and about one-third of these Indonesian-Americans reside in Los Angeles. The Indonesian Consulate recently established a new center in Los Angeles to support and serve the Indonesian community and forge connections with Los Angeles. How might the new Consulate in Los Angeles celebrate the diversity of Indonesia and Los Angeles? How might the external spaces use art to welcome and reflect the Indonesian community? In this 7-week studio, students will work with the Indonesian Consulate, Indonesian community groups, artists and designers to research and understand the history of Indonesia and Indonesians living in Los Angeles. Students will generate concepts for murals for the Indonesian Consulate center in Los Angeles that celebrate and reflect the diversity of Indonesia and Indonesians in Los Angeles. The Indonesian Consulate will select and fund the implementation of one or more student concepts.

Course number: ART-317
Prerequisite: n/a

Wet Paint

3

In the course, Wet Paint: Painting is painting, and there's no other art medium that maintains such a significant, yet ambiguous place in visual culture and human history. This course will investigate contemporary practices and current approaches to the art of painting locally, nationally, and globally, with an emphasis on examining work formally, philosophically, and from an historical viewpoint. Students will be responsible for developing their own body of work, preparing presentations, and participating in group critiques and discussions. There also will be weekly reading assignments and exercises to complete. Throughout, an attempt will be made to integrate studio practice and academic thinking into a composite whole. Wet Paint is a class taught jointly with Fine Art and Illustration faculty.

Course number: ART-112
Prerequisite: Take ART-101, Re-Thinking Art OR ILL-153, Composition and Painting

Wet Paint TDS

3

What's the significance of painting as an art? We'll begin by discussing it as a triangulated force-field: One corner comprises the intentions of the artist who creates the painting; a second comprises the expectations of the beholder who views the painting; and a third comprises the unique demands of paint itself. These three vertices are connected by a long history of painterly practice, punctuated by theoretical attempts to understand, promote, and exploit both painting and its practitioners. We'll explore these powerful connections in an attempt to discover the center (or centers) of the painting-triangle. Special emphasis will be placed on the state of painting today. Expect a substantial amount of academic homework. Students will be asked to read texts each week, write responses to what they read, integrate their thinking with their practice-and, above all, get wet. This Humanities & Sciences course is an integrated co-requisite to the Studio Wet Paint TDS. CO-REQUISITE: TDS-342

Course number: HCRT-342
Prerequisite: Take TDS-342 Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam