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Art Center College of Design | Pasadena, California | Learn to Create. Influence Change.

MEDIA DESIGN

 

Authoring Critical Media (MDP-529)

In this course students will create responses to the bi-weekly visiting lecturers of Design Dialogues using a variety of media forms including text, video, images, sound, interaction, etc. An emphasis will be placed on understanding contemporary issues, developing a critical voice, and deploying media to greatest effect.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Colloquium (MDP-501)

This is a weekly gathering of all students in the program for a peer discussion of project work. The colloquium emphasizes concept review, production planning, and clear communication of ideas. It also serves as a forum for department meetings.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 1

Colloquium (MDP-519)

Colloquium is a steady flow of people, ideas, methods, and provocations. As the sole space and time that the entire Grad Media community gathers together, Colloquium is one of the prime program-wide knowledge sharing opportunities. All program business is discussed here, announcements are made, and faculty and students give reports from the field. Design Dialogues with distinguished guests and off-site visits are interspersed with departmental pecha kuchas (a 6:40 performance lecture format limited to 20 slides, at 20 seconds each) and alumni updates. Grades for Colloquium are based on attendance, contribution, and quality of project documentation and reflection on student websites.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 1

Colloquium 1A (MDP-508)

Colloquium is a steady flow of people, ideas, methods, and provocations. As the sole space and time that the entire MDP community gathers together, Colloquium is one of the prime program-wide knowledge sharing opportunities. All program business is discussed here, announcements are made, and faculty and students give reports from the field. Design Dialogues with distinguished quests and off-site visits are interspersed with MDP pecha kuchas (a 6:40 performance lecture format limited to 20 slides, at 20 seconds each) and alumni updates. Students continue the dialogue online in the departmental website that tracks this activity through images and blogs and serves to provoke knowledge transfer, engagement, and community far beyond the walls of the MDP studio. The grades for Colloquium are based on attendance, contribution, and web presence (including a personal site) for each individual student.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 1

Colloquium 1B (MDP-509)

Colloquium is a steady flow of people, ideas, methods, and provocations. As the sole space and time that the entire MDP community gathers together, Colloquium is one of the prime program-wide knowledge sharing opportunities. All program business is discussed here, announcements are made, and faculty and students give reports from the field. Design Dialogues with distinguished quests and off-site visits are interspersed with MDP pecha kuchas (a 6:40 performance lecture format limited to 20 slides, at 20 seconds each) and alumni updates. Students continue the dialogue online in the departmental website that tracks this activity through images and blogs and serves to provoke knowledge transfer, engagement, and community far beyond the walls of the MDP studio. The grades for Colloquium are based on attendance, contribution, and web presence (including a personal site) for each individual student.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 1

Colloquium 2A (MDP-558)

Colloquium is a steady flow of people, ideas, methods, and provocations. As the sole space and time that the entire MDP community gathers together, Colloquium is one of the prime program-wide knowledge sharing opportunities. All program business is discussed here, announcements are made, and faculty and students give reports from the field. Design Dialogues with distinguished quests and off-site visits are interspersed with MDP pecha kuchas (a 6:40 performance lecture format limited to 20 slides, at 20 seconds each) and alumni updates. Students continue the dialogue online in the departmental website that tracks this activity through images and blogs and serves to provoke knowledge transfer, engagement, and community far beyond the walls of the MDP studio. The grades for Colloquium are based on attendance, contribution, and web presence (including a personal site) for each individual student.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Colloquium 2B (MDP-559)

Colloquium is a steady flow of people, ideas, methods, and provocations. As the sole space and time that the entire MDP community gathers together, Colloquium is one of the prime program-wide knowledge sharing opportunities. All program business is discussed here, announcements are made, and faculty and students give reports from the field. Design Dialogues with distinguished quests and off-site visits are interspersed with MDP pecha kuchas (a 6:40 performance lecture format limited to 20 slides, at 20 seconds each) and alumni updates. Students continue the dialogue online in the departmental website that tracks this activity through images and blogs and serves to provoke knowledge transfer, engagement, and community far beyond the walls of the MDP studio. The grades for Colloquium are based on attendance, contribution, and web presence (including a personal site) for each individual student.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Colloquium 3A (MDP-608)

Colloquium is a steady flow of people, ideas, methods, and provocations. As the sole space and time that the entire MDP community gathers together, Colloquium is one of the prime program-wide knowledge sharing opportunities. All program business is discussed here, announcements are made, and faculty and students give reports from the field. Design Dialogues with distinguished quests and off-site visits are interspersed with MDP pecha kuchas (a 6:40 performance lecture format limited to 20 slides, at 20 seconds each) and alumni updates. Students continue the dialogue online in the departmental website that tracks this activity through images and blogs and serves to provoke knowledge transfer, engagement, and community far beyond the walls of the MDP studio. The grades for Colloquium are based on attendance, contribution, and web presence (including a personal site) for each individual student.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Colloquium 3B (MDP-609)

Colloquium is a steady flow of people, ideas, methods, and provocations. As the sole space and time that the entire MDP community gathers together, Colloquium is one of the prime program-wide knowledge sharing opportunities. All program business is discussed here, announcements are made, and faculty and students give reports from the field. Design Dialogues with distinguished quests and off-site visits are interspersed with MDP pecha kuchas (a 6:40 performance lecture format limited to 20 slides, at 20 seconds each) and alumni updates. Students continue the dialogue online in the departmental website that tracks this activity through images and blogs and serves to provoke knowledge transfer, engagement, and community far beyond the walls of the MDP studio. The grades for Colloquium are based on attendance, contribution, and web presence (including a personal site) for each individual student.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Community Sensing (MDP-549)

Participants in this investigation will explore the role of design, technology, computation and social media as vehicles to mobilize community dialogue. Building on the emerging fields of computational journalism, citizen science and DIY technology students will design and deploy site specific interventions, networks and sense making systems to serve as vehicles to instigate and support community awareness, discourse and action. Emphasis will be placed on public presentation of projects and utilizing the diverse communities and geographies of Los Angeles as the locations for design exploration and intervention.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Computation & Materiality (MDP-530)

This studio class investigates formal aesthetic possibilities arising from the intermingling of the intangible world of electronic data and the tangible, phenomenal world of materials. Materials in this case can be physical, virtual (e.g. on-screen), hybrid, or indeterminable. The aim of the class is to advance our understanding about how fundamental aspects of computation could/do relate to design; to make us more sophisticated, discerning users of existing software tools; to investigate how design projects can stem from material explorations rather than responding to a predefined need or context.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Creative Technology (MDP-514)

Creative Technology prepares designers to research, develop and deploy technology oriented media design projects. The course teaches a range of technology skills and methodologies for designers by immersing students in programming, embedded computing, Web/network systems, mechanical design, and computer aided design/fabrication. While the class is broad and introductory, it rests on a "backbone" of programming, the lens through which a variety of content and concepts will be introduced.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 4

Creative Technology 2 (MDP-564)

Creative Technology prepares designers to research, develop and deploy technology oriented media design projects. The course teaches a range of technology skills and methodologies for designers by immersing students in programming, embedded computing, Web/network systems, mechanical design, and computer aided design/fabrication. While the class is broad and introductory, it rests on a "backbone" of programming, the lens through which a variety of content and concepts will be introduced.

Prerequisite: Take MDP-514
Course Credit: 4

Critical Frameworks 1 (Field) (MDP-535)

This course provides a space for students to connect issues, histories and theories from their work in the Core classes. The combination of readings, screenings, research, and guest lectures comprise the critical frameworks that are core to student work in their chosen track. In this class students will learn to find their own entry point into the critical dialogue of design and experience how the act of designing is always already embedded in that discourse. Students will learn to identify and develop their own unique point of view and to articulate and share it through writing and design.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Critical Frameworks 1 (Lab) (MDP-518)

This course introduces students to issues, histories and theories relevant to practices in media design and related fields. The combination of readings, screenings, research, and guest lectures comprise the critical frameworks that are core to student work in their chosen track. In this class students will learn to find their own entry point into the critical dialogue of design and experience how the act of designing is always already embedded in that discourse. Students will learn to identify and develop their own unique point of view and to articulate and share it through writing and design.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Critical Frameworks 2 (Field) (MDP-536)

Students consider issues from the project in the context of political/social theory, case studies from other fields, issues in development, the rhetoric of good, and cross-cultural design. Students learn project documentation practices, how to use writing as a tool for critical reflection, and how to connect individual experience with wider issues to develop individual research agendas.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Critical Frameworks 2 (Lab) (MDP-532)

This course continues the exploration of contemporary issues, histories and theories in media design and related fields. Students are challenged to respond to the readings, screenings, research, and guest lectures by situating their projects in a context that extends beyond the grad school crit room to engage with issues that impact the field of media design.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Critical Practices 1 (Field) (MDP-615)

This course provides a reflective space for situating the thesis work as it is under development. Students learn to situate their work within the literature and the field through both traditional and design-research-based scholarly activities. Students work with a team of advisors to develop the critical framing appropriate to specific projects and audiences.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Critical Practices 1 (Lab) (MDP-614)

This course provides a reflective space for situating the thesis work as it is under development. Students learn to situate their work within the literature and the field through both traditional and design-research-based scholarly activities. Students work with a team of writing advisors to develop thesis statements and papers and learn to approach writing as making.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Critical Practices 2 (Field) (MDP-625)

This course continues to provide a reflective space for situating the thesis work with an emphasis on the student's future practice as it is taking shape through the thesis project. Students learn about intellectual property, entrepreneurial strategies, scholarly practices, and models for design research and practice as it relates to their own.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Critical Practices 2 (Lab) (MDP-624)

This course continues to provide a reflective space for situating the thesis work with an emphasis on the student's future practice as it is taking shape through the thesis project. Students learn about intellectual property, entrepreneurial strategies, scholarly practices, and models for design research and practice as it relates to their own.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Data Stories (MDP-578)

This is a hands-on course. Students will build sensors and data logging devices and deploy them into places outside the controlled environment of the studio. Using data mining techniques they will analyze the data sets they generate to reveal behavioral patterns of people and the systems they interact with. Students will use this and other empirical data as foundation for a secondary deployment of sensing devices as part of a project where they create an interactive system, for example a dynamic system visualization or a device which responds 147intelligently148 to certain environmental conditions. Along the way we will look at systems that rely on multiple distributed sensors such as environmental monitoring sensor networks and 145smart home146 automation systems. We will also look at the growing range of consumer products and devices which allow people to generate and review personal data sets, e.g. personal trainer devices, home energy monitoring systems. The course will be co-taught by regular industry guests, notably from Intel146s People and Practices Research group. Saturday workshops will supplement the regular class teaching. Saturday workshop topics: Sensors and Data Logging; Tools for Data Mining; Procedural Literacy.

Prerequisite: TAKE MDP-543 People Knowing;
Course Credit: 3

Design Research Practices 1 (MDP-534)

Design Research is an emerging and greatly contested set of practices. The goals of research (the generation of new knowledge) combined with the skills of the designer (making things) can reorient design practice away from problem-solving and toward design for discovery 150 whether about people, materials, methods, practice, or forms. This class is a 5-week seminar that gives students an introduction to the field: an array of research traditions as well as recent developments in both project-based and human-centered work.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 1

Design Research Practices 2 (MDP-584)

This 5-week seminar runs concurrently with students' early thesis development. Students will be required to develop a deeper understanding of the design research context appropriate to their work. Students will be asked to locate their work within the field introduced in Design Research Practices I.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 2

Dev Core (MDP-510)

Dev Core is a studio course designed specifically to introduce Development Year students to the viewpoints and design approaches of the Media Design Program. Students will do a series of workshops and quick-paced design projects, each led by a different MDP Core Faculty member. Students will learn through dialogue, making, presentation, and critique.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Dsgn As Enqry:Good Livng in M (MDP-579)

This course is about foreseeing and uncovering intriguing new social situations, aesthetic experiences, psychological ramifications, resulting from people living increasingly electronically-mediated lives. In our investigations we will stray from a path which affirms obvious applications of new technologies to instead envision how bespoke systems, materials, spaces, objects can enable idiosyncratic lifestyles which rely on a more profoundly blurred distinction between physical and telematic boundaries. Designing for very specific contexts will allow us to explore ideas and possibilities that a more general approach would overlook. The intention is that the results will nonetheless be generalizable and useful; by articulating the issues and rationale involved in developing characterful designs for individuals we will be able to draw lessons and pose questions relevant to all future media technologies. This is a studio course. We will conduct our investigations using design as a mode of enquiry. Students will create alluring artifacts which embody unusual ways of thinking about our electronically-mediated lives. These artifacts are powerful research tools; they can engage a more general audience in productive conversations about the desired qualities of our technological future.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Field Core A (MDP-526)

Theory, Method, Research. What is the role (or even, responsibility) of the designer in working toward social change? Exploring the mutually inflected relationships between theory, method and design research-as gleaned from anthropology and the social sciences-students will work toward developing a research-based, critically reflexive, and socially-engaged design practice. What are the problematics and possibilities of design with regard to: regimes of knowledge, social and cultural difference, and forms of inequality? Students will develop skills in formulation of research problems; qualitative research tools and methods, secondary research strategies, and implementation of a range of research models including PI lead, collaborative, participatory, action research.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 4

Field Core B (MDP-527)

Media Design, People, Publics. Students learn the unique capacities of design as a mode of inquiry and point of engagement with people and publics. The course will host a critical dialogue about media design in a cross-cultural context and how can it be used to foster relationships. Students will learn about design's historical role in social environments and explore the design of new frameworks for social engagement, with a critical rethinking of standard communication and interaction design terms such as media, interface, branding, information, visualization, usability, and narrative.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 4

Field Core C (MDP-528)

Technology for Social Change. An introduction to information and communications systems for the global networked public sphere. Designed to leave students with a core competency in programming, network communication, and community information analysis, this course is a mixture of theory and practical learning and experimentation. Students will explore the relationship of technology to social change, and experiment with de novo social networks, non-standard communication systems, and other forms of culture hacking. Technical elements include programming, free software techniques and version control, data management and analysis, mobile telephony, and other systems for communication and data processing, while readings will range from network theory to the sociology of scientific knowledge.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 4

Field Projects 1 (MDP-533)

This semester combines structured activities with time for individual exploration and reflection with a focus on assessment and experimentation, in the studio and the field. How does one enter a new situation (a very new situation) and begin to understand (or interpret) points for design interventions? How does one evaluate and work with (or willfully ignore) social and cultural dynamics, politics, and one's own position as a designer? How does one negotiate the needs and expectations of project partners, design team members, and the local community? Perhaps most importantly, how does each student find their own entry point and connect it to their own design and research interests? By the end of the semester, students should have identified their topic. They should have a social network ('informants,' potential users, collaborators, fabricators, competitors) with which to effect their project. Finally, they should have an explicit understanding of their own responsibilities to the project in the near and long term, both ethical and logistical.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 12

Field Projects 2 (MDP-619)

This semester combines structured activities with time for individual exploration and reflection with a focus on prototyping, testing, and building sustainable interventions, in the studio and the field. How can one create tools or communication elements that work with/in a community? How does one "test" the usability, viability, and effectiveness of different design interventions? What does one "leave behind" and how can long term impact be developed and assessed? By the end of the semester, students will have created and deployed design interventions directly with the community, either independently or with classmates. They will have documentation of their project's impact, failures, and successes and a strong idea of their own position and future direction with this kind of work.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 6

Field Thesis 1 (MDP-616)

This course provides a structure for students as they work on their individual thesis projects.Faculty mentors guide small groups of students in the early stages of investigating and defining their thesis pursuits then each student works with a thesis committee-a team of thesis advisors selected to support each student's particular subject and approach. Students meet with their lead advisor on a weekly basis and with committee members individually and as a group.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 6

Field Thesis 2 (MDP-626)

This course provides a structure for students as they work on their individual thesis projects. Students work independently with weekly guidance from their lead advisor and intermittent meetings with thesis committee members individually and as a group. Includes a major project review in Week 9.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 12

Frm Seeing Machins-Seeing Thg (MDP-548)

This studio-seminar will begin with the history of devices and applications used in visual culture, from 1500 to 2050. It will be a journey into "seeing things," as well as seeing machines, how these mechanisms responded to their moments, how they faked, revealed, transfigured, transmogrified. We will explore the poetics and optical irony of storytelling across media, from live-action movies to animation on the screen, and in real space. We will look at different modes of storytelling that rely on design: drama, folklore, epics, picaresques, carnival, masque, along with the role of "seeing machines" for each of these modes, how optical tools edit time itself, or change point of view; even become characters themselves. What must be left out to make the rhythm effective? erasures, amnesias, ambiguities, hooks. Most of all, throughout this class, students will explore how digital imaging today can be understood more profoundly through new eyes: new points of origin, and the metamorphosis of old visual codes; to locate their own emerging visual grammars. Norman Klein will lead the class and will be joined by designer Geoff Kaplan, founder of General Working Group and a second filmmaker/animator to be announced.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Histories of the Future (MDP-581)

How many ways has the future been imagined? Even an initial list triggers many options for media designers: Parallel Worlds; Lost Worlds; the Body in the Future; 147imaginary mega- cities;148 utopian and dystopian phantasmagorias; environmental imaginaries; science-fiction cyburbias. By examining these built and unbuildable futures, we can integrate many fields, to discover tools from architecture, literature, cinema, animation, games.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Internship (MDP-900)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Intro to Interaction Design (MDP-507)

This course introduces students to fundamental issues and practices in Interaction Design. Through a series of design projects across a range of media, the course explores IxD principles, IxD design patterns, affordances of mediums and technologies, and practical approaches to building prototypes and working projects. Students in this 14-week hands-on studio course will design interactions in three main projects, working with content management systems, hand coding HTML and CSS, and building prototypes for mobile devices.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Knowledge-Sharing Workshop (MDP-618)

This course will examine an array of strategies for the production and dissemination of "knowledge", from the Wunderkammers to YouTube videos. Students will be encouraged to develop their own approch to contestualizing, analyzing, reflecting, and sharing the work of their master's project/s in their final exhibition, presentation, and web publication.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Lab Core A: Structures (MDP-511A)

In this course students will learn about how our interactions, lives, and even thinking are structured: from cities to computation to biology to language. Students will learn to approach the designing of structures as a way to generate the unexpected rather than to merely categorize and contain.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 2

Lab Core B: Interactions (MDP-511B)

Whether getting things done, biding time, following serendipity, or being entertained, users are readers, viewers, thinkers, and - in well-designed interactions - active participants who build their own experiences and meaning spaces. To learn about this approach, called productive interaction, students will create a tangible interaction as the means to explore an information space.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 2

Lab Core C: Interventions (MDP-511C)

This course is a hands-on investigation into how people engage with the world around them, powered by a motivation to explore and to develop new modes of perception. Using everything from low-tech electronics to social media, students will learn to interact with people and places with the goal of generating new insights into each.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 2

Lab Projects 1 (MDP-516)

Lab Projects are a series of two-to-five-week-long conceptual projects called "Inquiries" and are built around a theme emerging from culture, technology or science. Inquiries begin with a question or a phenomenon and ask "what if"? Each inquiry engages external collaborators, project partners, and travel to locations or extraordinary situations. The projects that result take a variety of forms. Students learn to: approach design as a critical investigation; structure their time and working process; document and articulate project concepts in presentation, exhibition, and web formats; work reflexively.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 6

Lab Projects 2 (MDP-531)

Each year the Lab track runs a set of five Inquiries- 2-5 week intensive projects built around a theme emerging from culture, technology or science. Lab Projects 2 begins with a question or a phenomenon and ask "what if"? Each inquiry engages external collaborators, project partners, and travel to locations or extraordinary situations. The projects that result take a variety of forms.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 12

Lab Thesis 1 (MDP-606)

This course provides a structure for students as they work on their individual thesis projects. In weeks 1-7, faculty mentors guide small groups of students in the early stages of investigating and defining their thesis pursuits. In weeks 8-14, each student works with a thesis committee-a team of thesis advisors selected to support each student's particular subject and approach. Students meet with their lead advisor on a weekly basis and with committee members individually and as a group.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 12

Lab Thesis 2 (MDP-636)

This course provides a structure for students as they work on their individual thesis projects. Students work independently with weekly guidance from their lead advisor and intermittent meetings with thesis committee members individually and as a group. Includes a major project review in Week 9.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 12

Master's Proj Design & Devlop (MDP-617)

Continuing with the project idea developed in Master's Project Research, students define their designs, produce prototypes, and prepare production plans for their master's project.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 9

Master's Proj Prod & Doc (MDP-627)

Continuing with the project prototype developed in Master's Project Development, students execute their master's project's concepts, perform user testing, describe their projects concisely in writing, and present the results formally to the community.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 12

Master's Project Res & Design (MDP-607)

Modeling the process on the techniques developed in the Super Studio, students research and design master's projects of their own choosing. This phase focuses on audience analysis, ideation, and proposal development.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 6

Material Worlds (MDP-575)

This studio explores materiality and texture, both conceptually as the injection of individual personality into the flat aesthetic of most digital media; and literally as the embodiment of digital mutability in physical space. As our daily immersion in digital media increases, so too does the opportunity/necessity of respresenting ourselves digitally. From questionnaires to profile pages to twitter streams to avatars, our digital 'self' carries the burden of compressing personality into bytes. At the same time, physical spaces and materials are becoming ever more mutable. Pixel-skinned building facades, dynamic lighting; programmable textiles, and myriad substrates with unique electromechanical or light-mediating properties; someday these may enable the "real" world to become as fluid as the virtual.. or is it vice versa? We will survey and analyze the ways people currently represent themselves technologically - whether on Match.com, in Second Life, or by bedazzling their cellphones - with an eye towards moving beyond VR, facade, and mirroring, toward a new type of hybrid digitalphysical place, and self.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Materials & Spaces As Media (MDP-573)

Beginning with the affordances and tangible qualties of different materials and environments, students will create projects that turn material and space into a media platform. Students will learn to work at various scales in relation to the human body as well as work with a broad range of materials - old, new, and emerging - in collaboration with our Colors, Materials, and Trends Laboratory. The emphasis will be on new approaches to the circulation of communication in the world around us.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Media History/Theory (MDP-502)

This seminar creates a context for the professional practice of media design by drawing on a thousand years of media history and criticism. Readings, screenings, and interactions help students to build verbal and visual vocabularies and to create a historical context for their own work. Critical reading, writing, and visual communications skills are stressed.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

New Ecology of Things (MDP-537)

This studio immerses students in the design implications of The New Ecology of Things, an emerging environment of pervasive networks, embedded and embodied technologies, where every object and space has a life of its own. Students will build working prototypes in the physical world, using sensors, effectors and computation to create objects and spaces that take advantage of this new ecology. In particular, students will work beyond the efficiencies of task-oriented applications, and explore meaning-making systems through productive, mythological and embodied interactions. Students will be challenged to create antidotes to the meaning-sapping uniformity of everyday technological life. Projects will create a more heterogeneous, embodied relationship with digitally enhanced things and activities. Considering the entire context of use - object form and function, physical environment, affordance, interface, gesture, system behavior, haptics, and social factors - students will craft new ecologies that are suited to specific activities rather than generalized to many.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

New Modes of Reading & Writing (MDP-574)

Writing sits at the intersection of technology, language, and culture. Print culture - reproducible words on paper - has contributed to the development of deeply-rooted cultural notions regarding memory, power, identity, and definitions of authority and knowledge. Digital communication technologies may change all that. This class is for designers of texts who are curious about the emergence of new reading and writing practices. The history of typography does not give us the tools to understand what is happening now. Through a series of readings and guest lectures, we will look at how linguists, anthropologists, and literary scholars understand texts in unique ways that may help us reconceive our role as text-designers. Most importantly, we will investigate the implications of this massive paradigm shift by designing texts, text interfaces, and reading tools of all kinds from the macro to the micro, from the centralized to the distributed, from the single genre to the mash-up, from the linear to the spatial.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Objects, Spaces & Media (MDP-577)

Increasingly, media designers work in environments outside of paper and screens. In this studio course students will be introduced to the issues and ways of working that come with designing for the physical world. Students will learn to work at various scales in relation to the human body as well as work with a broad range of materials151old, new, and emerging151in collaboration with our Colors, Materials, and Trends Laboratory. Throughout, objects and spaces are understood as part of a media ecology as well as tools for generating meaning.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

People Knowing: Interaction (MDP-571)

The goal of this course is to discover unexpected user interactions and creative abuses that allow designers to cast aside their assumptions about users and engage creatively in the process of designing interactions. Students will create paper and working prototypes to test applied and speculative outcomes in a series of experimental designer/user engagements. This class will be co-taught by visiting designers and technologists from industry.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

People-Knowing (MDP-543)

People have been theorized variably as users, audiences, viewers, readers, markets, visitors, etc. This course will expose students to a range of approaches that allow designers to engage creatively with people, as people, to inform and inspire new design.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Post-Grad MDP Research (MDP-799)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Productive Interaction (MDP-553)

Whether getting things done, biding time, following serendipity, or being entertained, users are readers, viewers, thinkers, and - in well-designed interactions - active participants who build their own experiences and meaning spaces. This is what is meant by Productive Interaction and it requires that interaction designers considers themselves to be co-creators of meaning. Students will learn various approaches to Interaction Desing and explore design strategies for achieving these goals through readings, discussion, design projects and critique.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Seeing MacHines (MDP-576)

This seminar will cover the history of devices and applications used in visual culture, from 1500 to 2050. It will be a journey into "seeing things," as well as seeing machines, how these mechanisms responded to their moments, how they faked, revealed, transfigured, transmogrified. The subjects will include: examples from Renaissance camera obscura (and lucida) to early photography (19th century); examples of "subverted" perspective (anamorphosis, trompe l'oeil) in Baroque architecture and theater; the miniature and the hoax (including "follies," imaginary micro imagery); cinema from magic lanterns in 1650 to "industrial" cinema after 1895); optical printing from 1560 to 1990; mirrored "tricks with smoke and mirror (i.e. Pepper's Ghost); animation as the history of "the moving picture" since medieval carnival, puppetry); from industrial giganticism to nano miniatures today; and of course, the history of "pre"-analog as well as analog systems.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Studio Independent Study (MDP-975)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 1

The Ubiquitous Moving Image (MDP-591)

This course will expose students to the newest innovations in moving image culture and offer a series of investigations and experiments in the form, function, and fit of ubiquitous visual media. Students will explore behavior and movement in the non-narrative context of the interface as wel as design time-based graphical narratives for screens, devices, and environments from the macro to the micro. The emphasis will be on developing new cinematic languages that exploit the relationship between medai affordance, cultural context, and viewer/user esperience.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Thesis Continuation (MDP-699)

Required course for student that have completed all their course work but have not completed their thesis. This "0" unit, no cost course should be taken every semester until the thesis is complete.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Thesis Gateway (MDP-610)

Thesis Gateway is a Pass/Fail Zero unit course that Media Design students must pass in the Spring before entering into their final year... their Thesis Year. If a student does not pass, the student is required to do a Lite Term in that Summer to work on those issues in which the student is lacking. The student will re-take Thesis Gateway at that time. If the student does not pass a second time, the studnet will be dismissed from the program.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Thesis Workshop (MDP-676)

Please see Department Chair

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Thesis Workshop 1 (MDP-611)

In the Fall semester, faculty mentors will guide small groups of up to 5 students each in the development of their thesis projects in Weeks 1-7. In Weeks 8-14, students will meet with a team of thesis advisors individually and as a group.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 6

Thesis Workshop 2 (MDP-612)

In the Spring semester, students work independently on the development of their thesis project/s with guidance from their team of thesis advisors. Students will engage in individual and group meetings with thesis advisors throughout the semester. There willbe two major milestone presentations, on in Week 2 and one in Week 8 when the project itself should be completed. (Thesis exhibition, presentation, and web publication are due in Weeks 13 & 14).

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 9

Transmedia Design (MDP-517)

Students will learn to design in a 147media-specific148 manner that makes the most of the affordances of various media types from print to interaction. Students will be introduced to core concepts within media design.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Visual Narrative (MDP-522)

Explores a range of linear and non-linar storry-telling strategies across a variety of media. Learn/create to combine film and graphic narrative strategies to create inventive scenarios and tell stories about media in people's lives.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

amp Studio (MDP-540)

amp is an initiative within the Graduate Media Design program that experiments with new modes of research, expression, and application of ideas of contemporary relevance. Each year the amp studio addresses a different topic. Students actively engage in three types of work: research, individual design work, and a collaborative group project. The group project is continued in the summer and completed by the beginning of the Fall term.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

   
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