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Art Center College of Design | Pasadena, California | Learn to Create. Influence Change.
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HUMANITIES & SCIENCES

 

Adv Ent Project Studio (HNAR-402)

Write, develop, create, and finish a self-directed, entertainment-based project. Graphic novels, sock puppets, CG, and everything or anything in-between. An advanced workshop that offers the structure, support, and rigor it takes to complete an ambitious making/writing project. To earn the three Humanities units for this course, students will: Develop a writing and planning process for large-scale projects; write several times every week; write well-composed texts that 1) meet the drafting markers we collectively establish, 2) observe, employ, and experiment with the conventions of the proposed genre and 3) function within the form and context of the proposed finished work; critically read student and published texts; actively participate in constructive discussion of writing during every class. This is a co-requisite class to TDS Advanced Entertainment Project Studio. Concurrent enrollment requirement for 3 credits studio TDS and 3 credits Humanities/Human credits.

Prerequisite: Take ILL-253;
Course Credit: 3

Adv Game-Writing Studio (HNAR-371)

This course explores the connection between narrative and the visual experience in the game design realm. Its goal is to provide students an in-depth framework for how to approach crafting a narrative in this interactive medium, along with an understanding of how game design mechanics are connected with developing player agency, and how visuals support these elements. Additional topics will include how the narrative experience transcends text; sound design; visual themes; animation choices; and core game design decisions. Students will craft five character studies, create copy for marketing a game, generate a character relation chart, write a list of rewards and punishments to motivate players in a game, keep a game diary of their video game experiences throughout the course, and combine these elements into an original full game design document. Students will utilize a combination of hands-on-gameplay, lecture and discussion, in-class exercises, and creative writing workshops to foster a greater understanding of the connection between narrative and visual elements with the process of game development. The students will finish the term with a portfolio of copy that connects the various narrative components of the interactive medium, including all of the elements mentioned above.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Adv Screenwriting Workshop (HNAR-437)

This is an advanced screenwriting workshop that provides students the dedicated time, support from instructor and student and structure needed to move a story from concept to the written script form. Each student is responsible for making consistent progress on a script project they commit to on the first day of class. Preferably, this script project is one that they have begun in HNAR-337 Screenwriting and already is in a solid 3-Act Structure format, with well-developed characters. Additionally, each student is expected to contribute to supporting their fellow classmates' goals through reading and well-considered critique. A collaborative project between enrolled students is also acceptable, as long as the writing is divided equitably among teammates. Pre-req: HNAR-337 Screenwriting, or TDS-319 The Storytelling Project.

Prerequisite: Take HNAR-337, Screenwriting, or TDS-319, The Storytelling Project
Course Credit: 3

American Politics & Media (HSOC-301)

Is the media liberal? Are all politicians in the pockets of corporations? Is dissent unpatriotic? Is the U.S. a nation to be loved or feared? Is it a democracy? An empire? Both? How are we, as citizens (of any country), to find our way through the rhetoric of the left, the right, the middle? How can we make sense out of the increasing flood of political and cultural information that bursts from our computers, televisions, radios, newspapers, and movies? Whom should we believe? This course seeks to provide the tools to help make sense of it all.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Anatomy & Psych of Perception (HSCI-230)

Visual perception includes both observation and interpretation, and ranges from the mere detection of objects being present in the visual field to the construction of reality and the assessment of meaning. In this course we will study the anatomical structures involved in seeing (the eye and the visual cortex), relating them to both "normal" and dysfunctional seeing, including characteristics of the visual field, the perception of color, brightness, and depth, and the recognition of faces. The psychological processes relevant in visual perception include attention and selection, seeing emotional content, and the relation between seeing and thinking. We will deal with the neurological equivalent of these processes, and study both normal and abnormal perception of the environment and the body. The objective is to gain an understanding of seeing-as-action, as a neuropsychological construction, and to become more aware of the characteristics of the experiential phenomena of seeing.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Applied Psychology (HSOC-120)

In this course, students will learn how the study of psychology can provide answers to real world problems.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Art & Practice of Leadership (HPRO-330)

The ability to negotiate, communicate, influence and persuade others to do things is indispensable to everything you will accomplish in your business and personal life. The most effective people are those who can organize the cooperation and assistance of other people to accomplish goals and objectives; this is the definition of Leadership. This course is designed to assist the student in understanding the multiple styles and traits of Leadership. Everyone has different values, opinions, attitudes, beliefs, cultural values, work habits and goals. Fortunately, leaders are made, not born. You will learn Leadership, by studying what other excellent leaders have done before. Students will be divided in teams and each team will study various greatest contemporary leaders to learn their Leadership styles and traits. This course is designed to give you the critical tools you will need to run a great Design company.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Art of Research (ADT,GPK) (HSOC-100)

Increasingly, designers use research as a critical component of the design process to establish a strong problem foundation, to discover fresh, uncharted opportunities, and to test their design hypotheses. This course provides you with a toolbox of techniques and methods for design-centric research as an integral component of the design process that can be used throughout your career. Beginning with a short survey of how research has been used historically, the course quickly moves to hands-on projects that explore a variety of research methods and processes: from media surveys to interview techniques and the ethical considerations required with their use. The research methods explored in this class expose students to both non-discipline-specific and discipline-specific techniques, balancing the research process between form-making, community insight, and critical reflection.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Art of Research (ID Majors) (HSOC-101)



Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Art of Research - Fine Artists (HSOC-102)

As fine artists, we know that concepts, materials, and processes combine to make a work, but how can we nurture our innate curiosity to feed our work more deeply? Get brave with research! In this class we empower your creative process to reach heightened levels of curiosity leading to a richer artistic vision. We will map research strategies to find undiscovered inspiration within areas you are already passionate about. You will chart discoveries and deal with inevitable failures as you expand your process of inquiry to make new work. Faculty will bring unique insights from social science research and visual art practice to help you embrace brave choices in unknown territory. We will study artists' research processes in a variety of areas and mediums and use scientific inquiry, literature, social science methodologies, photography, prototyping, and material applications to explore new avenues in your practice. This class is a 3-hour project-based seminar with weekly assignments including writing, artwork, audio-visual presentations, and field trips. It will culminate in a final exhibition.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Art of Thinking: Philosophy (HCRT-300)

This class grapples with the hardest and deepest of all questions: Is life a matter of fate? Is knowledge power? Is there a soul? Is existence absurd? Is beauty in the eye of the beholder? Does morality even exist? We will read selections from historical philosophical texts and address intellectual watersheds that haunt the modern mind, from "Plato's Cave" in ancient Greece to Michel Foucault's "Madness and Civilization." Above all, we will learn an Art of Thinking, in which there are no answers, but there aremoments of insight and clarity. Students will be expected to read difficult material, write opinionated papers, and contemplate ideas that can profoundly alter our lives.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Asia in the Imagination (HCRT-301)

Through examining representations of Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans in visual media (film, fashion, art, and advertising), this course will explore constructions of race and gender as seen through Western eyes--which were stereotyped and racist during the 19th and early 20th century--and how and why that changed in the latter part of the 20th century.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Automotive Engineering (HSCI-200)

This course covers the principles of engineering that guide the development of automobile design and manufacture, including automobile functionality and an overview of the demands placed on the design process.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Avant-Garde Film 1 (HNAR-331)

In one course it is not possible to show the entirety of avant-garde film history, but only a slender chunk of it, like a core sample taken from a tree commonly thought to be dead. Unfortunately, history (in the guise of the market economy's triumph) has not been very kind to the avant-garde canon: films have fallen out of distribution; texts have gone out of print; whole careers have disappeared. In spite of these depredations, idealists still believe that alternative film practices have not yet exhausted themselves. Avant-Garde Film's screenings and readings may even suggest possible strategies for an independent cinema that conceives of itself as more than just a fawning poor relation of Hollywood.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Avant-Garde Film 2 (HNAR-335)

Avant-Garde Film 2 continues the film screenings and readings of Avant-Garde Film 1, however the first is not a prerequisite for this course. In one course it is not possible to show the entirety of avant-garde film history, but only a slender chunk of it, like a core sample taken from a tree commonly thought to be dead. Unfortunately, history (in the guise of the market economy's triumph) has not been very kind to the avant-garde canon: films have fallen out of distribution; texts have gone out of print; whole careers have disappeared. In spite of these depredations, idealists still believe that alternative film practices have not yet exhausted themselves. Avant-Garde Film's screenings and readings may even suggest possible strategies for an independent cinema that conceives of itself as more than just a fawning poor relation of Hollywood. Attendance is particularly important in this class, as many of the films are not available on DVD.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Bioissues (HSCI-223)

Biology is promised to be the technology of the 21st century, where breakthroughs in science and engineering will offer longer, healthier lives and cleaner, more sustainable technologies. This course focuses on the history and potential futures of biomedicine and biotechnology, with particular emphasis on the social and political contexts of the science. Case studies will explore topics in evolution and ecology, microscopy and cellular imaging, DNA sequencing and genomics, sex, gender, and reproduction, genetic engineering and agriculture, tissue engineering, and neuroscience. Course material will span from reading of scientific texts to analysis of work by bioartists critically engaging with the contemporary biosciences. The course is intended as a broad introduction to issues in biology and bioart; previous coursework in biology is not required.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Branding Strategies (HSOC-210)

The purpose of this class is to gain a more thoughtful and critical understanding of a brand, its history, current trends, social and ethical implications, and cultural context, as well as the brand's relationship to our individual and generational identity. We will explore sustainability and its impact on brand value, and what it means to create truly responsible design. Students will conduct and evaluate various forms of research and develop brand platforms and creative briefs to inform and inspire innovative solutions within their current design projects. Through class discussions of design thinking, critiques of design work, guest speakers, presentation and analysis of case studies, and development of branding strategies and strategy diagrams, we will examine how a brand is defined and translated through environmental design, product, graphics, advertising, and communications. We will work in multidisciplinary teams in a design charette format to created branded projects to directly implement what we have learned over the term.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Bus Affairs for Filmmakers (HPRO-230)

This class offers an insider's view of the business side of film and television development and production, from the acquisition of rights and the negotiation of agreements for writers, producers, directors, and actors, through the many avenues of distribution, including consideration of ancillary markets and so-called new media. Several class meetings will feature guest speakers, including top industry professionals such as studio executives, directors, producers, agents, etc. This class is open to all majors.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Business & Professnl Practice (HBUS-201)



Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Business 101 (HBUS-101)

Building a successful career requires not just talent, but an understanding of what it takes to be in business. Business 101 is an introduction to the business side of creative practice. The course is divided into two parts: general business information, including starting up, intellectual property, and money; followed by topics specifically geared towards the illustration, photography, or design business, including marketing and self-promotion, pricing and estimating, contracts, and client relationships.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Business of Design (HBUS-300)

The skills learned throughout your education at Art Center are invaluable for acquiring a position in the field of product design. But in this extremely competitive field, skills alone will not ensure a successful career. Individuals who excel, whether as entrepreneurs, corporate designers, or consultant designers, have embraced and exploited their role in the bigger universe of industry. Designers who understand business, corporate disciplines and systems, and how design can strategically contribute to business objectives and goals enjoy rapid advancement and a higher level of career success.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Children's Literature (HNAR-310)

This course has you consider children's literature and asks you to write fiction or non-fiction for children. You need not be a writer to take this course--you learn by doing. We will read and analyze stories for children, ranging from myths to modern works, from young children to young adults. We will examine narrative structure and some of the basic requirements for writing books for publication. You should leave the course with a better understanding of the role literature for children plays in their lives, and how to create it.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Cinema Against the Grain (HNAR-351)

American commercial films have been the subject of sustained commentary and debate for nearly as long as they have been produced. Their work on spectators in society is understood rather well by marketing executives, by intellectuals, and indeed by many "average" consumers, if the relentless self-reference of contemporary movies can be accepted as proof. The latest blockbuster -- soon to be commonly acknowledged classics -- address us as though they are the only satisfactory alternative. They (and their flacks) suggest that it would be perverse to want anything more from a movie. And yet, some people go looking elsewhere for film history. There is no unifying theory of works that offer resistance to the dominant model. A number of disparate tendencies and histories must be taken into account. This course takes up a discussion of a few of them in an attempt to suggest possible strategies for those still interested in pursuing a contestatory film practice.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Collaborate Leadership (HPRO-331)

Your ability to thrive in an increasing interconnected world is vital to having a successful career. Leadership in a creative context means being able to direct, influence and persuade people of all kinds. Being powerful and effective requires an understanding of when to take charge and when to join forces to work as a team. Collaborative leadership is about working together to achieve goals. This course will explore leadership styles and decision-making; the impact of culture, gender and heritage on leadership; communication and risk taking; motivating and negotiating with people; and team dynamics. You will learn leadership skills via experiential exercises within ever evolving group scenarios throughout the term. Guest speakers and a range of readings on leadership theory will demonstrate a variety of approaches to the concept of modern collaborative leadership.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Contemporary Chinese Art (HCRT-330)

This course traces the emergence of China as a contemporary society through its visual culture. After World War II the country was dominated by a Socialist Realist aesthetic in art, film, and design for publications and posters. During the era of "reform and openness" in the 1980s, artists and students were finally allowed to see what the rest of the world was doing, and launched their own experiments in art-making--even inventing a movement called Political Pop, which caught the attention of curators and collectors in the West. Topics to be covered include the dominance and subversion of the written language, the re-use of folk imagery, and the tradition of disguised protest in art.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Contemporary Chinese Cinema (HCRT-302)

One of the most exciting cinema cultures to emerge in recent decades is that of Mainland Chinese cinema. Mired in propaganda for the first three decades after the Communist revolution (1949), Chinese cinema finally found its authentic voice with the Fifth Generation, which emerged in the 1980s. These talented and ambitious filmmakers were graduates of the Beijing Film Academy, which had been shut down during the disastrous Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), and they were eager to tell stories truthful to the modern Chinese experience --- while eloquently using cinema language. The films they made --- such as "Yellow Earth," "Raise the Red Lantern," and "Blue Kite" --- were often banned at home but found audiences abroad through international film festivals, and the directors were lauded as auteurs. Today, Chen Kaige and Zhang Yimou are internationally recognized, and a younger generation steps in to try to capture China in transition. This course will start with examples from the silent era (1930s) and Communist propaganda films (early 1970s), then quickly move into the films that became international sensations. Also covered will be the art films of Yang Fudong and Jia Zhangke.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Contemporary Place-Making (HHIS-393)

What defines a place, and how have our notions of place changed and evolved during the modern and postmodern eras? In this course, we'll examine the cultural, social, political, and economic forces at play in the design of spatial experiences. Beginning with industrialism and the start of the modern age, we'll explore how ideas about the nature of everyday life begin to change paradigms of thought in art, politics, and philosophy; eventually altering both the practice and products of design. Following this thread through to postmodernism, we will examine the ways these shifting ideas continue to develop, and manifest in contemporary design work, paying particular attention to the design elements of place; including: commercial, domestic, civic and recreational spaces. Design as a cultural product, will serve as a framework to investigate and discuss the evolution of place in multiple contexts as experienced by many users. In addition to design examples, we will look at precedents in art, architecture, film and literature. Readings will consist of key theoretical texts of the period. As we unpack the meanings of place, we will develop a critical lens through which we can better analyze and apply to our own work.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Conversational Japanese(TAMA) (HHUM-101)

This is an introductory conversational Japanese course designed to help students prepare for their study abroad experience in Japan. In this course you'll learn useful conversational phrases and vocabulary words for everyday life situations such as introducing yourself, traveling, shopping, and eating out. An overview of the Japanese writing systems will also prepare you to read basic signs and menus. You'll also gain a cultural understanding and acquire basic conversational skills through interactive exercises, dialogues and field trips. This course is restricted to students selected for the TAMA Study Abroad Program in Japan.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Creating Social Impact (HSOC-206)

This course is designed to provide students with both the historical context and foundational research skills they need to create art, design, and media for both local and global social innovation. During the first half of the term we will analyze social documentary photography, human-centered design, museum exhibitions, films, urban planning, and architecture to help students establish a framework for understanding creative interventions into international development and social advocacy. Building on this context, each student will conduct an independent research project that investigates a topic or opportunity within the field of social impact. Students will create images, objects, and writing as part of an integrated research practice, and revise these materials in ways appropriate to the practices of art and design; they will also practice design research and introductory ethnographic field methods in order to gain fresh insight on their chosen topics. Students will be challenged to think critically about the cultural, political, and economic effects of art and design interventions. Final projects will consist of a presentation and a short paper detailing each student's research experiences and reflections.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Creative Pres. & Critiques (HPRO-201)

The goal of the course is to provide an understanding of the structure, relevance, delivery and preparation needed for persuasive and compelling presentations and critiques. This course can raise awareness of what professionals do to develop and sell their ideas. Presenting well is a requirement for the development of the designer's voice and the work itself. This course gives a designer, solo or in a team, what they need to be able to craft effective presentations to large and small audiences, in virtual or physical spaces. Critiquing methods will be reviewed and practiced to enable students to effectively give and receive input on their ideas and the ideas from their teams.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Creativity Workshop (HHUM-001)

No need to enroll/no credit. Open to all Art Center students (undergraduate and graduate), this workshop consists of one-on-one meetings with the creativity coach at times to be arranged. The focus is on releasing your untapped creative energies to make your work more alive, dynamic, original, and truly fulfilling. Creativity-enhancing processes are easily customized for your specific needs and goals. It's simple, fun, and free, and produces dramatic, immediate results for projects/assignments in all design disciplines.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Critic At Large (HHUM-002)

Artist and critical studies professor Pauline Sanchez will meet with students to discuss and critique ongoing student production, including writing, fine art, and/or design projects, to deepen their understanding of history, culture, theory, and how their work functions in the contemporary art and design world. Further reading and/or research may be assigned. Students will sign up for one-hour meetings.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Critical Practice 1 (HCRT-100)

This course will provide a basic visual vocabulary or rhetoric. The primary learning objective is to understand how images work--successfully or not--to convey the intended meaning of the artist/designer to a desired audience. Rather than ask what images mean, the emphasis is on how they work in a variety of contexts. In other words, students will learn the rhetoric of visual communication, with "rhetoric" understood here as a form of persuasion that produces an intellectual and physical transformation in the viewer.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Cultural Anthropology (HSOC-112)

Cultural anthropology shows the organic design of culture in general, emphasizing the similarities and differences between cultures in the world. By the end of the course the student should understand the basic institutions of all cultures as well as be able to discuss the traits, rituals, and lifeways of several specific cultures. We will answer the following questions: Why do people in different parts of the world act so strangely and why should design and art students care? How do anthropologists discover the design of culture? Why do mothers in the Beng culture give their babies chili pepper enemas? Why do you speak with an accent when you learn a second language? When is your wife's mother also your father's sister? Why is Indian food served on metal trays? and many others.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Design for Sustainability (HSCI-251)

"Design" is being redefined, and designers must now use their unlimited ingenuity to consider the environmental consequences of materials, production methods, performance, and life cycling. Students learn the fundamental principles of the science of ecology, study methods for evaluating environmental performance of design/product concepts, and learn current strategies for creating a sustainable interface between design and the environment.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Design for Sustainability (HSOC-281)

"Design" is being redefined, and designers must now use their unlimited ingenuity to consider the environmental consequences of materials, production methods, performance, and life cycling. Students learn the fundamental principles of the science of ecology, study methods for evaluating environmental performance of design/product concepts, and learn current strategies for creating a sustainable interface between design and the environment.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Digital Electronics (HSCI-214)

The leading edge of design is becoming increasingly high tech. Microprocessors are enabling designers to incorporate both sophisticated behaviors and intelligent user interfaces into their products. This class will introduce students to a modern, low-cost microprocessor, the Arduino, and teach the core electronic sciences required to use it to control interactive design. This class assumes no prior knowledge of electronics, although students should have basic mathematical skills.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Documentary Film (HNAR-344)

Documentary Film is a survey of non-fiction films, most from this century, but all reflecting on concerns left over from the previous one. The topics addressed include the way people work, resist oppression, and invent culture; and, most importantly, how they have persistently envisioned utopia, often with results at variance with their intentions. Spectators and critics have at times declared the practice of making documentaries perverse or meaningless, yet these films continue to have popular appeal; indeed, the public's appetite for them only seems to grow as the notion of non-fiction itself threatens to be evacuated by advances in computer graphics, public relations, and cosmetic surgery. The genre has attracted filmmakers interested in everything from exploitation to edification; what their works have in common is a relationship to life as it is lived. Students curious about how our society came to be how it is today will find some answers in recent documentary films.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Dreams, Myths & Fantasies (HSCI-288)

How do we get ideas? Where do they come from? Are they just luck or can we find a path that leads us reliably towards them? It is "the deep imagination" that is the source of inexhaustible inspiration. As artists we need to understand what it is and how to establish a relationship with it. This class, in conjunctions with TDS-358, aims to further that life long journey to inspiration and personal growth as an artist. Combining the insights of modern psychology and creative techniques, this course proposes to deepen our understanding of the symbolic dimension of image making. By exploring our dreams, fantasies, and other products of our unconscious we will reveal the relevance of the world's mythologies to our personal lives and work, and how as artists we impact the community. A team of faculty members from different disciplines: illustration, psychology, literature, and theater, along with guest faculty will lead the explorations.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

ESL Basic (HWRI-040)

This is a basic college-preparatory writing class for ESL students.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

ESL Placement (HWRI-ESL)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

English as Second Language (HWRI-050)

This is an advanced college-preparatory writing class for ESL students.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Entrepreneurial Spirit (HENT-300)

An entrepreneur is a true innovator, someone who recognizes opportunities and organizes the resources needed to take advantage of them. Henry Kaiser, the steel and automotive magnate, said that entrepreneurs "Find a need and fill it." Entrepreneurship is about hard work, reducing risk, and promoting a simple solution. Entrepreneurs have a "prove it" attitude and pursue a complete understanding of how their product works. Entrepreneurs leave nothing to chance.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Environmental Issues (HSCI-221)

This course explores the impact of overpopulation, urbanization, pollution, politics, and environmental activism on the land, oceans, and atmosphere. Such topics as endangered species, biodiversity, overpopulation, animal rights, deforestation, desertification, toxic waste, global warming, ozone depletion, wetlands destruction, oceanic threats, and overgrazing will be covered. Students will be better informed to interpret complex environmental issues and apply them to their work and daily lives. They will be better prepared to have their work, either design or fine art, reflect the urgent nature of global concerns. They will also be introduced to the idea of science as the foundation of the realities facing our world today.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Environmental Issues (HSOC-282)

This course explores the impact of overpopulation, urbanization, pollution, politics, and environmental activism on the land, oceans, and atmosphere. Such topics as endangered species, biodiversity, overpopulation, animal rights, deforestation, desertification, toxic waste, global warming, ozone depletion, wetlands destruction, oceanic threats, and overgrazing will be covered. Students will be better informed to interpret complex environmental issues and apply them to their work and daily lives. They will be better prepared to have their work, either design or fine art, reflect the urgent nature of global concerns. They will also be introduced to the idea of science as the foundation of the realities facing our world today.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Fashion Cultures (HSOC-320)

Fashion is a way of thinking and doing that impacts all aspects of our lives and is an integral part of all areas of design and media. This class explores fashion concepts and the principles of style through three different cultural case studies -- Japanese esthetic philosophies, materials, and social narratives as represented through fashion culture from the history of the kimono and is design influence, to contemporary innovators Issey Miyake, and Eri Matsui and their engagement with technology, mathematics and architecture. Black style and its meanings, impact and influence, cultural esthetics and values, social and political narratives, and fahsion icons from Church women to the Black Panthers, Diana Ross to Michelle Obama. Fashion in entertainment and media culture -- how personal style defines and expresses character and establishes cultural contexts in movies, television, music and dance, and how it influences fashion. Students will participate in research, presentation, and collaborative and individual fashion projects, as well as critique and discussion.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Films Michelangelo Antonioni (HNAR-338)

A Study of Modernity and Its Discontents. This course is an auteur study in which we consider Antonioni's challenges to traditional approaches to storytelling, cinema, and realism in favor of intellectual contemplation and political thoughtfulness. Starting with his earlier neo-realist films, the course will move throughout his 45-year career to consider his use of action, image, radical narrative, disconnected events, experimental color, and documentary.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Films of Alfred Hitchcock (HNAR-343)

This course is not a production film class, but a course that composites possibilities of how to view and interpret an Alfred Hitchcock film, (or a film/sign), alongside an immense history of theoretical and critical writings. The course examines authorship, spectatorship, and identity together with other issues of reflexive film, and film's relationship to issues in painting, theatre, architecture, opera, music and sound, and literature. We view and research Hitchcock?s films by the use of multiple lenses including an expressionist's lens, a surrealist lens/or a psychoanalytical lens, a surveillance/voyeur lens, a semiotic lens, supported by readings by Raymond Bellour, Jacques Lacan, Slavoj Zizek, Gilles Delueze, William Rothman, Leland Pougue, Fredric Jameson and others. The course also examines the political and social atmospheres of the times in which the films were made, and identifies the filmographies' affect/effect, its pop cultural manifestation and influence. In connection, the course explores Hitchcock's universal themes, clarifies Hitchcockian space, suspense, objects and the use of the McGuffin, and distinguishes his use of Hamlet persuaded theatre. Starting with the Pleasure Garden in 1927 and ending with Family Plot in 1976, the director made 59 full-length films and scores of television 1/2 hours plots that locate characters in a fear constructed social system.

Prerequisite: Take HMN-100 Writing Studio, HMN-101 Writing Studio Intensive or Passed Writing Prof Test
Course Credit: 3

Films of Jean-Luc Godard (HNAR-332)

This course is an in-depth auteur study of one of the most influential filmmakers of the Nouvelle Vogue or French New Wave and his influence on art, cinema, and critical thinking since his career began to the present day. Topics include Godard's defiance of the conventions of Hollywood, his radical and unambiguously political understanding of film history, his economic and cultural views, his scholarly interpretations of philosophy and cinema, his participation in film studies and film theory, and his thought-provoking associations between painting, poetry, and cinema.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Films of Luchino Visconti (HNAR-333)

This course is a comprehensive study of Italian Neo Realism: cinema's power to obsess and to convey the socio-economic, psychological, and political realities of the post WWII era, as well as its influence on new cinema and cultural politics. Visconti's influence on world cinema remains a major voice in style and rhetoric, as it influenced the work of Godard, Fassbinder, Scorsese, and countless others.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Films of Michael Haneke (HNAR-339)

This course is an auteur study of the films of Michael Haneke, one of the most important directors working in Europe today. The course will consider and debate the world view of Haneke's films that frequently interrogate prevailing contemporary ethical dilemmas with precise transparency and uncompromising observation. The course will reflect on why Hollywood in its monolithic denotation does not know how to interpret and consider these films, yet, film history, criticism and reputable film juries across the world esteem this work with their highest honors. Topics that the course will cover include the misfortunes and barren nihilism that Haneke's political and philosophical considerations will be examined. A chronological selection of films will be viewed representing categories and interests that concern Haneke's themes. Discussions, readings and research papers are organized to develop the student's interests in visual culture alongside their own developing visual production.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Films of Rainer Fassbinder (HNAR-334)

An in-depth look at the films of Ranier Fassbinder: director, screenwriter, actor, and one of the most important figures in New German Cinema.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Films of Robert Bresson (HNAR-342)

Comprehensive study of the social, economic, political and formal complex cinema of Robert Bresson. Analysis of cinema in the tradition of auteur study.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Films of Stanley Kubrick (HNAR-336)

This course examines the vast maze of social, political, and psychological subjects Kubrick's films tour within their stylistic and conceptual density. We will track recurrences and parallels between films, focusing on their historical and theoretical subtext, in order to clarify the nature of his cinematic universe.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Fldwk: Theory & Practice (HSOC-303)

This course will introduce students to methods for incorporating cultural immersion and social engagement into the creative process, with a focus on the diverse communities of Los Angeles. We will examine how researching and making within real-world urban contexts can inspire creative interventions, foster cross-cultural dialogue, and expose students to unofficial knowledges and alternative ways of learning. Participating students will create and conduct their own locally based research projects that explore opportunities for active engagement with the social, political, and cultural landscapes of our city.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Future of Science & Technology (HSCI-216)

The future isn't just something that happens but something that can and should be shaped by people with vision; choosing the correct path cannot be left entirely to the scientists and technologists, nor to politicians and entrepreneurs. This class will focus on understanding the basic science behind the upcoming revolutions in bio-technology, artificial intelligence, and quantum science, and on engaging students in developing a shared vision of a desirable future. Topics will include: robotics and artificial intelligence; quantum, nano, and bio-technology; future energy sources; and mankind's possible future in space. The range of problems that our society will face in coming years will be discussed, with particular emphasis on the science behind issues such as global warming. Ethical dilemmas posed by technology will also be explored.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Gender Project (HSOC-201)

In this advanced undergraduate seminar, students will use their own imagination to explore the complicated role of sexual desire and gender identity in contemporary art and design, and to question whether the arts are complicit in the gendering of social and personal space. Through reading, writing, discussion, and art-making, we will address important, if potentially uncomfortable, issues surrounding childhood sexuality, intersexuality, perversion, prostitution, pornography, casual sex, acquaintance rape, marriage, and morality. While we will touch upon traditional issues in academic gender studies (feminism, queer theory, the "nature vs. nurture" debate), we mostly will grapple with human desire and creative potentiality in our individual quests for friendship, sex, power, and love.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Genre Lit: Goth, Det., Sci-Fi (HNAR-313)

Much of today's popular storytelling is informed by genre conventions that originated in literature more than 100 years ago, specifically (and chronologically) in Gothic, Detective, and Sci-Fi novels and short stories. Understanding the "language" of these genres makes us more fluent and adept contemporary storytellers, and can inspire us to innovate, to create something new. This class will define, track, and evaluate conventions in these genres through to the present day, attending especially to texts that combine tropes from more than one kind of story. Students will generate critical and creative responses to the material covered in class.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Graphic Design History 1 (HHIS-240)

This course traces the development of visual communication from the first evidence of human image-making through the mid 20th century, including the evolution of letterform design from the earliest pictograms into the Middle Ages and through the Industrial Revolution. Social, scientific, and technological development are stressed as factors impacting the field. Through lectures, readings, and assigned essays, media presentations, and exams, students hone their ability to recognize conceptual and stylistic trends from the past and how they communicated ideas in the service of education, political messaging, business/commerce, and arts and culture. This knowledge will help students solve problems in today's studio graphics classes and clarify the current influence of graphic design on how society thinks about itself and the products it consumes, plus the role of visual communications in politics.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam Take HHIS-110
Course Credit: 3

Graphic Design History 2 (HHIS-340)

This course presents a critical examination of issues, theories, and practices relevant to contemporary professional graphic communication, with an emphasis on design creativity and progress as rooted in artistic, cultural, political, economic, and technological contexts. The class picks up from Graphic Design History 1 at the mid-century Modernist era, examining an eclectic diversity of significant individuals and groups up to the present. Topics of discussion include Postmodernism, new media, and design ethics.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam Take HHIS-240 Graphic Design History 1
Course Credit: 3

Greek Mythology (HNAR-320)

Whether your interests lie in narrative, in archetype, in religion, in social and political organization, or in the development of "Western" ethics and mores, the collection of works that contain what we think of as mythology are indispensable resources to understanding some of the base material from which emerged European/American civilization. In this course we will read some of the major works of Greek and Roman "mythological" writing, as well as look into the historical contexts that helped to create the stories that continue to vibrate in the imaginations of we who are almost 3,000 years removed from the oldest of the texts.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Guided Study: Bus/Prof (HBPP-396)



Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Guided Study: Bus/Prof (HBPP-496)



Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Hist Entertainment&Media Dsgn (HHIS-211)

From the scripted spaces of the Baroque to the mediated streets of today's cities, from the birth of cinema to the manipulation of space in contemporary media, this history course explores worlds invented through technology. We learn how politics and the body are part of the convergence of media and entertainment from the nineteenth century arcade, to the vaudeville circuit, to Coney Island, to Theme Parks and themed cities; from early cinema to the late 20th century extension of the body through special effects and hidden effects, to the parallel worlds that invade us, and lure us. We also critically examine emerging trends and contemporary modes, and ruptures still remaining from media in the past, plus how the viewer responds to all these entertainment environments.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Hist of Science & Technology (HHIS-291)

Everything, and everyone, has a history that informs our present and future. This history stretches back into the past, and every history has its own history. The influence of science has saturated social, cultural and political life around the world for centuries. This class is designed to introduce you to the history of science and technology, starting in the 16th century and going up through the twentieth century and into the 21st, and emphasizing the 19th and 20th centuries. The course topics will be global, although with an accent on Western science and technology. Rather than being comprehensive (an impossible task), we will work through six specific topics. Each of these topics has a long arc and covers a tremendous amount of useful breadth and depth, as follows: Biological evolution; the history of scientific illustration; the history of color and color theory; the history of models (the universe, evolution, revolutions in science, etc.); environmental history; and aerospace and the Cold War. We will also have several guest speakers, and visit several exhibits and libraries.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

History & Futures of IxD (HHIS-260)

Interaction design and digital technology are changing the way humans relate to everything, from games to relationships to work. Designers of digital technology products no longer regard their job as designing a physical object--beautiful or utilitarian--but as designing our interactions with it. This class introduces the industry's history, from humans' first tools through the industrial revolution to computer-supported tools of interaction design. Charting the history of entrepreneurial design in technology, students will see how their own design process, focusing on people and prototypes, prepares them for emerging technologies, social change, and the future of human interactions.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History & Theory of Space 2 (HHIS-390)

This course explores the multifaceted nature of urban, public, and private spaces, paying special attention to the sociopolitical, cultural, and economic forces that shape our built environments. We will review a range of scholarship from various academic disciplines and intellectual spheres, but remain focused on the realm of design and particular design products that provide us with a framework to understand the context within which particular spatial and design outcomes are observed. Aiming to contextualize various phases of design and spatial strategies since the late 18th century, we will pay particular attention to the forces that "produce" space, recognizing that gender, culture, and the everyday life of cities must be considered and evaluated against various theoretical and ideological perspectives. Interior and exterior spaces, exhibits, entertainment spaces, bars, cafes, sites of collections (e.g., museums), and many other realms that define and are affected by design will be analyzed in order for us to understand, albeit in an ephemeral manner, the forces that shape what we call our spatial experience.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam and HHIS-290 History and Theory of Space 1
Course Credit: 3

History and Theory of Space 1 (HHIS-290)

This course focuses on the social production of space within a historical context, offering an in-depth analysis of spatial dynamics in various societies across times and places. Using multiple analytical lenses, students will become familiar with how space is conceptualized and how its structure is informed or produced by social, cultural, economic, and political forces. In re-examining various design concepts, from antiquity to the present time, and from Asia and Africa to Europe and North America, students will be exposed to spatial processes that are affected by our purposeful functional organization and aesthetic sensibilities.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Advertising (HHIS-200)

The class is intended to establish an historical context from which students can build a solid understanding of advertising's role in the development and reflection of society. Through lectures, readings, guest speakers, and exams, students expand their awareness of historical events and hone their ability to recognize conceptual and stylistic trends from the past. Extensive slide presentations support the lectures and the readings. Advertising students in particular can find immediate use for this course, as they solve problems in studio advertising classes and re-interpret the historical material into new ways of addressing the promotion of products and services in the agency environment. With a clearer understanding of social evolution reflected in history, students can move toward creating more socially responsible work for the present day.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Art 1 (HHIS-220)

Beginning with the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods and extending into the High Renaissance, we will examine the interrelationships between the production and consumption of art, and science and religion. How have the latter influenced the former? What roles have religious institutions and scientific discoveries had on artists and designers? How have artists and designers responded to the demands of religious institutions and the discoveries of scientists?

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Art 2 (HHIS-221)

Students in the course will examine the diversity of artistic production (painting, sculpture, and architecture, among others) in Europe during the 15th to the late 19th centuries, a time of tremendous historical change. They will analyze the ideas and values encoded in the most significant works of art to arise from this period by considering the social, cultural, and political circumstances in which these objects were produced and understood. Students will explore not only how objects were shaped by the society in which they were made, but also how art contributed to social and political transformation. The required text will provide the chronological bearings, historical background, and images for the course.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Art 3 (HHIS-222)

Students will engage with the history of visual culture in the second half of the twentieth century, with an eye to how the conventions of artistic practice, its criticism, and its exhibition change during this era. We will consider a variety of media, including painting, photography, film, performance, sculpture, and installation, and will examine the shifting roles of each in the realm of contemporary culture. We will also investigate the changing significance of terms such as Modernism, avant-garde, and author within the social and cultural realm. We will remain focused on the always-changing political landscape over the past sixty years, including the trauma of one World War, the Cold War, the various liberation movements starting in the 1960s, the dissolution of the Communist Bloc, and the AIDS crisis, in addition to the ever-growing late-capitalist globalization we continue to experience today.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Automobile Design (HHIS-281)

This course will examine the evolution of automobile design: we will learn about the growth of the industry and at what point design, as we know it, became an important part of making cars. The historic development of the design process will also be examined, along with significant automotive and industrial designers who have influenced car design. Many cars, from the mundane to the exotic, from all points in automotive history, will be discussed and reviewed, with emphasis on those that have proved to be particularly influential on subsequent designs or have remained design icons. Although analysis of their design will be an important part of the course, their industrial, social, and commercial significance will also be considered.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Cinema 1 (HHIS-230)

Students explore how the aesthetic and technical development of the cinema (from its beginnings until 1941) established, defined, refined, and changed the nature of the medium and the way we see, in the context of historical, cultural, political, and socio-economic determinants. Students also examine the ideas, implications, and ramifications of important trends, movements, styles, genres, theories, and directors. Finally, through intensive analysis of the ways in which the formal elements of design of the image are manipulated for expressive purposes, students learn how to really "see" and more fully experience the expansive potential of the cinema.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Cinema 2 (HHIS-231)

Students explore how the aesthetic and technical development of the cinema (from 1941 to the present) defined, refined, and changed the nature of the medium and the way we see, in the context of historical, cultural, political, and socio-economic determinants. Students also examine the ideas, implications, and ramifications of important trends, movements, styles, genres, theories, and directors. Finally, through intensive analysis of the ways in which the formal elements of design of the image are manipulated for expressive purposes, students learn how to really "see" and more fully experience the expansive potential of the cinema.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Illustration (HHIS-250)

This course examines the history of illustration, from the printed works of the Renaissance old masters, through the "golden age" of American illustration, to today's new media imagery. Students will compare the creative works of more than 100 illustrators and fine artists and analyze how illustration has redefined both its boundaries and functions in mass media. Class discussion topics include: artistic innovations, visual literacy, aesthetic theories, and the relationship between fine art and illustration.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Industrial Design (HHIS-280)

This course provides a basic understanding of the movements, ideas, and events of industrial design history over the past 150 years, and reveals, through study of past masters, both how the profession has evolved to its present state and where it is going. The class will serve as a foundation for a life well spent in the practice of design.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Photo 1 (HHIS-270)

This academic course presents an artistic, cultural, and social history of photography. Through readings of critical texts, slide presentations, movies, and a field trip, students will examine the varied uses and functions of photography. Themes include: war photography and ethics, the history of food photography, the portrait, and the pictures generation.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of Photo 2 (HHIS-271)

This academic course offers a thematic survey of historical and contemporary issues pertaining to photography, in the context of art and the world at large. Through readings of critical texts, slide presentations, movies, and a field trip, students will examine the ways that photography has been utilized by artists, journalists, scientists, amateurs, and a range of other practitioners; how meaning has been constructed in the photographic image; and how photography has been used in society. Themes include: new topographics, photography and documentary, the photographic archive, and the digital world.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History of the User (HHIS-265)

In the aftermath of WWII, information theorists and ergonomics experts joined forces to test a new hypothesis: if complex technological systems (e.g. vehicle control panels, consumer electronics, interstate highways) could be designed to mesh with the needs and abilities of their human users, then it might be possible to facilitate proper use--and to prevent disasters--without any advance training or instruction. From these experiments was born the user, a creature ensconced in a world of tools and networks customized to his or her unique physiological and psychological preferences. Today, there is hardly a field of design practice that has not incorporated the paradigm of user experience design (UxD) as part of its core methodology--indeed, the memory of a time before the user has all but faded. To correct this pervasive amnesia, this course takes a critical, in-depth look at the history and theory of user-oriented design from the early 1900s to the present day. Through writing and creative projects, students will be asked to reflect on the status of the user in their own practices (whether in design or fine art), and to ask what kinds of behavior--personal as well as political--this term does and doesn't allow.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

History-Entertainment Design (HHIS-210)

Entertainment design history develops students' ability to conceptualize and express creative ideas related to stories and experiences.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Human Factors & Design Psych (HSCI-202)

This course will familiarize students with general human factors principles that are at the heart of any effective design. Students will be introduced to areas of human performance, cognition, ergonomics, memory, and behavior. Reading assignments plus in-class and take-home projects will expose students to a variety of human factors theories and design examples. Two group projects are required: these allow students to apply the principles they have learned.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

IP: Law & Busn for Artists (HPRO-300)

Law and Business for Artists and Designers covers a full range of legal and business issues, including the language used in contracts that affects the license, sale, and creation of designs and other original works of art and design. This course will cover: the basics of copyright law, fair use and copyright defenses, trademark law and registration, maintaining trademark rights and avoiding infringements, and patent law. We learn how to file a copyright application; searching the availability of a trademark and filing a trademark application; how to get a business license, form a corporation, prepare a deal memo, and negotiate a contract; and how to negotiate the resolution of a dispute, a new job position, and a promotion.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

IS: History (HHIS-975)



Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Illumination: Lighting (HSCI-203)

This course introduces students to numerous aspects of illumination, from the practical to the conceptual, from the creative to the technological. We will survey the history, technology, and design of lighting through both research and hands-on experimentation. Field trips, lectures, readings, and guest presentations will cover topics including: optics, basic circuits, and electrical wiring; technologies such as LEDs, fiber-optics, CCFLs, EL and neon; lighting in space, and of sculpture and products; history and theory of color; artificial illumination and day lighting; the affect of light on neurology and psychology; retail, commercial, and residential lighting strategies.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Immigrant/1st Gen American Lit (HNAR-210)

American Literature as we now know it was in its very beginnings compose largely of the voices of people who arrived to this continent from somewhere else, as a political and economic refugees, religious pilgrims or captive slaves. Today, American Literature is still enriched by the voice of The Immigrant and/or The First Generation American, each of whom navigate geographies and cultural systems sometimes parallel to "native-born" Americans or in the shadows as invisibles/undesirables. Often, their stories reveal truths about the culture in which they arrive, and provide opportunities for thoughtful discussion about context, story-telling and the current state of the "new Americans." We will read novels and a memoir published in the last twenty years, as well as other selective readings from current events to inform our discussion and writing projects.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Indep Study (HWRI-975)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Independent Study: Bus/Prof (HBPP-495)



Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Independent Study: Bus/Prof (HBPP-395)



Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Innovating Medical Devices (HSOC-458)

The goal of the ABI program is to teach students a framework for developing medical device innovations that address unmet clinical needs (viewing those needs as opportunities) and to prepare students for careers in healthcare, product development, and entrepreneurship. The course consists of a series of weekly lectures which are intended to complement practical experience that students gain through an interdisciplinary team-based project. During the winter quarter, the project teams are assigned an unmet clinical need identified within the UCLA Health System, and teams are tasked with brainstorming and developing concepts to solve these medical needs. Lectures include invited guest speakers and panels composed of UCLA faculty as well as industry representatives from venture capital, medical device, design and law firms. The spring quarter of the course focuses on concept refinement, prototyping, provisional patent submission, and building a business plan. Additionally, this quarter each project team is assigned an industry mentor to provide guidance on the product development process and entrepreneurship as it relates to medical devices. The culmination of the course is the completion of a business plan and pitch by each project team, which will be presented to a panel of venture capitalists at the end of quarter.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Insights (HSOC-205)

As the role of the designer becomes more holistic and multi-disciplinary, we must develop the ability to think strategically about the markets we are designing for. This course teaches how to become insightful about the world around us by developing the strategic skills to translate information into innovative opportunities. It introduces the process of trend research, analysis, and articulation into potential design and business opportunities by understanding consumer technology and design trends that impact our world and how we, as designers, can respond to those trends in the future. Insights has been built around industry practice--from corporations like Nokia, Nike, Target, and Apple that have dedicated "Design Insights" teams, to consultancies that specialize in providing insight and trend information to their clients. You will research one topic, learning and following a specific process. At the end of the class you will prepare a visual communication piece summarizing your findings and pointing out the potential design and business opportunities to follow.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Insights for Trans Design (HSOC-285)

"Insights" is a co-requisite of the sixth-term transportation design studio. This class guides designers in the creation of innovative vehicle concepts based on a strong foundation of research. Designers learn how to create compelling conceptual frameworks, driven by unique insights and articulated in a thoughtful, meaningful context. Since this class responds to a new sponsor brief each term, our focus is customized for each project, but our process remains constant. We employ a range of design research methodologies (primary and secondary) including observation, photo-documentation, ethnography, interviews, and trend tracking and forecasting. We keep the human story at the center of what we do, while considering broader trends that impact culture. Our work is closely coordinated and integrated with the design curriculum in the sixth-term studio class.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Intro to Entrepreneurship (HENT-100)

In this course students will gain an understanding of how to create entrepreneurial ventures from self-initiated projects. They will learn how artwork, design and products are developed from the entrepreneurial standpoint including how a design varies based on the business context. Some students will choose to create a new company and will develop a start-up strategy to evaluate the feasibility of the company (ies). Products can be two-dimensional graphics or illustrations applied to existing product categories, new stylistic designs, entertainment or media properties, product design, brand concepts or technical inventions.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Intro to Modernism (HHIS-110)

The class will explore, discuss, analyze, and compare various aspects of modernist culture including the visual arts, design and architecture, film, the performing arts, music, literature, and science and technology, and provide a historical perspective and critical insight into the political, social, and philosophical dynamics of the era, and its relevance to our current time.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Intro to Robotics (HSCI-231)

Introduction to Robotics offers you the opportunity to explore the increasing role of automated mechanisms in our world and learn what it takes to build your own robots. This course is part survey, part technical application. Hands-on robot designing and building figures strongly as we encounter topics through team "design challenges," in which we see what makes up a robot and investigate ways to control them to do what we want.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Is Art Possible After Google? (HSOC-365)

How should we gauge the impact of the Internet on contemporary art? Does the advent of Web-based image aggregators and curatorial platforms (e.g. Pinterest, Contemporary Art Daily, thejogging.tumblr.com, #ArtSelfie) spell doom for the art profession, or at least, for its traditional institutions and markets? Or, to adopt a more optimistic perspective, have the databases, online archives, and retail networks of Web 2.0 revitalized the methods and materials available to contemporary artists, enabling universal access to supply chains and data flows? In this class, we will seek to understand the practical challenges posed to artists (and also critics, curators, spectators) by the omnipresent Web; we will also consider the "post-internet" condition in terms of the larger historical trajectory of modernism and its antecedents.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Is Art Possible After Google? (HCRT-365)

How should we gauge the impact of the Internet on contemporary art? Does the advent of Web-based image aggregators and curatorial platforms (e.g. Pinterest, Contemporary Art Daily, thejogging.tumblr.com, #ArtSelfie) spell doom for the art profession, or at least, for its traditional institutions and markets? Or, to adopt a more optimistic perspective, have the databases, online archives, and retail networks of Web 2.0 revitalized the methods and materials available to contemporary artists, enabling universal access to supply chains and data flows? In this class, we will seek to understand the practical challenges posed to artists (and also critics, curators, spectators) by the omnipresent Web; we will also consider the "post-internet" condition in terms of the larger historical trajectory of modernism and its antecedents.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Light & Color (HSCI-217)

Why is the sky blue? Why is blood red? Why is the sun yellow? Why does a blood-red sun, setting in a deep blue sky, occasionally turn green? This course begins with a history of light, from mystical representations of light and vision in ancient Greece to the strange quantum duality of particles and waves. From there we will shift to a more classical approach: to scattering, and why sunsets are red and the sky is blue. From the properties of light waves, we will move on to refraction and lenses. There will be one major class project: designing and using an advanced pinhole camera, which utilize many optics concepts and offer unparalleled opportunities for experimentation and artistic exploration.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Like: a Competition (HCRT-368)

What does it mean to "like" something? 'Like' is a ubiquitous, bandied-about word in contemporary society: it's usually a declarative, democratic, and safe way to express an opinion. We often share our aesthetic interests by publicly saying what we like. In an attempt to up-the-ante and make us more committed to the things we like, this course will give us tools to defend our own pleasures, desires, and fantasies, and to make what we like have consequences. We'll think of art and design as a competition --- not just a job, success or money --- but for the hears and minds of audiences. "LIKE: a competition" will address personal and cultural formations of taste and beauty and will look at strategies for describing the creative process in a world of subjective preference. We will deal with a variety of subjects, including the correlation between music and visual culture and the visual-historical moments in art that signal aesthetic shifts in societal thinking. We will examine the history of political and artistic manifestos as fundamental ways in which people transform their theories into action. Students will critically examine the apogees and pitfalls of political theory and aesthetic dogma, and maybe have the opportunity to write an aesthetic manifesto of their own. This is a transdisciplinary discussion and project-based course that attempts to place the humanities deep within art and design practices. It questions the distinction of theory from practice and thinking from doing. As such, participants will receive both studio and academic credit. (3 units of H&S Critical Thinking)

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Los Angeles Histories/Myths 1 (HSOC-302)

L.A. was a postmodern city by 1890, and has remained for generations "the most photographed and least remembered city in the world." Students in this class will trace the historical trends that have shaped these contradictions.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Magical Realisms (HNAR-325)

Magical Realism exists because in literature, anything is possible. This is not only a question of "suspension of disbelief", but of applied layers of truth as the author assumes them. We'll look at stories beyond belief and reason to find possibility, bask in the richness of language and become lost in worlds on no map or right here in Los Angeles. We will read five novels, as well as other selected readings from world literature to inform our discussion and writing projects. The objective of this class is to consider what is possible in literature, and what can be identified as "Magical Realism" versus "Surrealism" or "Fantasy", as well as to provide opportunities for discussion of techniques of story-reading as well as story-telling.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Manufacturing Technology (HSCI-280)

This course is structured around the major fabrication technologies used by designers and manufacturers throughout the world. The emphasis will be on current and emerging manufacturing technologies that many design studios are currently associated with. The major areas covered will be Materials and Processes used in the Metal Industry, The Plastic Industry, The Wood Industry, The Ceramic Industry and The Glass Industry. Technical experts in each area will add their support along with unique Tours of each related industry. There will be a text book which was written just for design professionals. Guest Lecturers and special Tours are a big part of the course. The object is to expose students to many of the major manufacturing technologies that can influence their designs and the ultimate production of related products.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Marketing and Self Promotion (HPRO-320)

This class is designed for photography students who'll be guided by a creative services consultant specializing in working with photographers and photography agencies. The world is a big place, just putting up your website and sitting back and waiting for jobs to flow in, does not cut it in this competitive field of photography. This class will focus on effective and creative marketing strategies individualized for each student. Topics include identifying who the client is and how to market a distinct message to that audience. Also covered in the class will be promotional campaigns, budgeting for marketing, the effective use of the changing social media landscape and portfolio presentations. To help each student, students will receive a one on one interview to develop a marketing plan tailored to their needs and skill sets. At the end of the term, each student will have a better grasp on where to find their clients, how to approach them, how to interact and how to keep them.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Materials & Methods 1 (HSCI-206)

This course introduces students to the many universal plastic materials and fabrication processes currently used in design and product development. Students will learn how to recognize and evaluate materials and processes that influence product development, and how to do basic cost estimating relating to different processes and aspects of model making.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Moby Dick (HNAR-312)

In the middle of the 19th Century, before the Civil War, America was in a state of dynamic, nation-defining flux. In the midst of the political turmoil and his own, personal tumult, Herman Melville produced the definitive novel of the American 19th Century, Moby Dick. And while the book is famous for its obsessive, maniacal central figure, Captain Ahab and his relentless hunt for the monstrous white whale that took off his leg, Melville wove into the adventure story the conflicts of race, power, industrialization and colonialism that were, and, some would argue, still are at the core of American life. This course will explore Moby Dick as a work of literature and as a record of its historical moment.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Narrative Strategies (HNAR-200)

Almost all writing involves some sort of narrative. So does film, illustration, advertising, photography, and fine art (among other disciplines). This course will look at narrative as a group of strategies that can be applied to various literary genres (i.e. fiction, poetry, screenwriting, etc.) or to work outside of traditional genres in the formation of new or alternative modes of story telling or message-bringing. We will look at "traditional" and "experimental" uses of narrative as used in language, and then try our own hands at writing through and with the strategies we examine (and, possibly move beyond them). We will also look at examples of work within the categories of Art Center's various disciplines to see how narrative is used in them, and consider what kind of recombinant possibilities might be explored. In both what we read and what we write, we will focus on four main narrative types: linear narrative, nonlinear narrative, lyrical narrative and fragmented narrative.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Narrative Structure (HCRT-200)

Narrative Structure will take the same approach as Critical Practice I, which provides a basic visual vocabulary or rhetoric for different areas of focus, such as film genres, contemporary art, television, internet media, and others, based on the expertise of the instructor.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Neurons Sparking (HSCI-271)

With neuroscientists blazing the trail to understanding the neurobiology of human perception and computational technologists crunching the numbers to create new means of neuroimaging, artists are compelled to ask new and different kinds of questions about their own engaged process of looking, seeing, and doing. Pivoting on the Allosphere research conducted by the Art, Media, and Technology team at UC Santa Barbara, Neurons Sparking! introduces students to the continuum of intellectual and art histories and theories that enrich today's art and biotech practices. Strong consideration will be given to the early modern artists--Monet, Seurat, Cezanne--in light of their interests in science and technology of their day. To ground our discussion in a contemporary context, we will visit the Allosphere. With our minds and brains challenged by new research into synesthesia and computational abstraction, we take up an informed discussion of perception in the twenty-first century.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Neuroscience of Imagination (HSCI-330)

Seeing, visualizing, and dreaming are closely related: they are all perceptual experiences. In this course we will explore what is known about visual imagination (visualizing), as the neurological mechanisms of visual imagination offer a foundation for comparing it to other visual experiences. As often in neurology, we can learn from brain scan and brain lesion studies, allowing for examination of both normal visualizing and its disorders. Psychological studies investigate the role of visualizing and like other forms of imagination in cognition; as visualizing is a private experience, we will look at phenomenological analyses and compare them with our own first-person knowledge. Finally, we will explore what happens when we externalize visualizing in the forms of sketching, drawing, or painting.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Ocean Science (HSCI-222)

This class is designed to be an interesting introduction to ocean science, developing in students a deeper understanding of our planet's largest feature, its origin and its uniqueness, plus investigating the ocean as a significant influence on our everyday lives. Students will learn about the sensitive interconnectedness between delicate biological balances and physical driving forces, as well as the life-style choices we make that profoundly impact the ocean. This course is for the student who is curious about the ocean, yet who may have little or no formal background in science.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Perpetual Motion: Moving City (HSOC-202)

This course will introduce new ways of understanding the modern city as a dynamic rather than static entity, focusing on how cities and regions are conceived, and how they function, thrive, move, and sometimes fail. Early suburban utopias, contemporary edge cities, squatter cities of the south, and the shrinking cities of the north will all be analyzed, always with an emphasis on mobility--or the lack of it. In short, this course will serve as a primer for the problems and challenges associated with the built environment and its integrated and overlapping systems that require great expense to be built, maintained, and changed.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Physical Anthropology (HSCI-210)

This course studies human biology within the framework of evolution with an emphasis on primates, primate behavior origins, leading to the 65 million years of ancestral human physiology as evidenced by the fossil record.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Plagues and Civilization (HSCI-220)

Over the course of the last 4,000 years, civilizations have risen and fallen because of disease. From the biblical plagues to the black death, from leprosy to AIDS, our diseases have defined us. Sometimes plagues have been anticipated, and sometimes they have swept down upon us unannounced and unexpected. Sometimes the result is personal suffering, and sometimes it is a total collapse of civilization. This class is an exploration of how societal practices create (and eliminate) diseases. We will start with the plague of Athens, which helped to destroy the Greek empire, and follow different diseases across both geography and time. In many cases, causes can be found for both the appearance and the disappearance of disease. This information will be of great value to any one who designs or plans for the urban environment.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Plagues and Civilization (HSOC-203)

Over the course of the last 4,000 years, civilizations have risen and fallen because of disease. From the biblical plagues to the black death, from leprosy to AIDS, our diseases have defined us. Sometimes plagues have been anticipated, and sometimes they have swept down upon us unannounced and unexpected. Sometimes the result is personal suffering, and sometimes it is a total collapse of civilization. This class is an exploration of how societal practices create (and eliminate) diseases. We will start with the plague of Athens, which helped to destroy the Greek empire, and follow different diseases across both geography and time. In many cases, causes can be found for both the appearance and the disappearance of disease. This information will be of great value to any one who designs or plans for the urban environment.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Presentation & Career Prep (HPRO-202)

This course concentrates on the transition you will ultimately make from a student to a business professional, emphasizing the need for strong presentation skills and giving you the confidence to promote your ideas coherently and convincingly. Classes are designed to address the real world issues you will encounter as you present your portfolio, go on job interviews, negotiate salaries, interview for freelance assignments, network, pitch your concepts, and make proposals. You will participate in videotaped mock interviews with industry professionals and gain the self-assurance necessary to organize, edit, and deliver effective business presentations.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Pro Practices for Artists (HBUS-320)

The pursuit of art today can sometimes seem like a capricious and daunting endeavor; there is clearly no one path or plan that serves all artists' aspirations or guarantees success. This course presents practical advice for artists that can aid in achieving the various satisfactions derived from a life in art. Some topics explored include: tools for documenting your achievements and assessing your objectives; choosing a graduate school; setting up a studio; putting together a professional portfolio and resume; project proposals and artist statements; foundations, grants, and artist-in-residence programs; legal issues, contracts, and copyrights; finances, accounting, and bookkeeping; art sales, representation, and galleries; critics, curators, and collectors; art teaching and academia; and what skills you will need for various art-related employment options. Class discussions will also touch on how best to deal with the inevitable challenges of being a working artist--pressures, motivation, competition, and rejection. This course will present an overview of the numerous opportunities that exist today for artists, and strategies for accomplishing your dreams.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Professional Pract. Internship (HPRO-900)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Professional Practice 1 (IxD) (HPRO-260)

In this class students learn how the practice of interaction design engages other designers, business/marketing professionals, artists, and technologists across various disciplines. Student will learn how to effectively strategize, communicate and develop their ideas for social and business entrepreneurship, consulting and studio sectors. Practical exercises in pitching, portfolio development, designing communication collateral and working with clients prepare students for professional practice. Visiting guest and studio visits will cover topics such as intellectual property, venture capital and social innovation.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Professional Practice 2 (IxD) (HPRO-310)

Building on Professional Practice 1 for Interaction Design, this class supports and guides students as they develop their own portfolio, professional direction and communication skills.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Professional Presentation (HPRO-200)

This class will begin preparing students for the presentation of their work and of themselves as professional photographers. Students will make a variety of presentations, speaking about their own work, the work of other artists, and on other topics as well. The class will develop research and speaking skills, begin the practice of constructive critique, and explore the variety of venues and new media for presenting work to prospective clients and the public.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Project-Writing Workshop (HNAR-300)

An advanced writing workshop that offers the time, structure, support, and rigor it takes to complete an ambitious writing project. Each participant is responsible for: 1) achieving substantial progress on a writing/making project (i.e. the first issue of a magazine, a web comic, an illustrated cookbook, a short story collection, a 'zine, a choose-your-own-adventure e-book, a graphic novel, or something else entirely) they commit to on the first day of class, and 2) contributing to their classmates' progress through thoughtful reading and critique. Student projects may be personal, or concurrently assigned in another class; the latter will require signed permission from the studio instructor. Collaborative projects between several enrolled students may also be acceptable, as long as the writing is divided evenly and in a way that supports the logic of the proposed project. In this course, the instructor is also a participant, writing and workshopping her own project at the pace the class collectively determines is appropriate for the range of projects proposed on the first day.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Properties Art Materials Wkshp (HHUM-003)

This workshop is an opportunity to ask questions and get answers on the materials you use in painting and drawing. Students are encouraged to bring in examples of what they are working on and not only get information on the best tools for the task, but also on their safety and permanency. Available to all students on a first come, first served basis. No appointment or registration necessary.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Properties Artistic Materials (HSCI-218)

The information in this class is as vital to a practicing artist as knowledge of surgical instruments and pharmaceuticals are to a surgeon. We will explore the physical and chemical properties of artists' materials, both common and uncommon, and how to select the right tools for the job. We will cover fine art, graphic art, and illustration materials: drawing materials, painting materials and mediums, pigments, electronic print media, papers and boards, canvases and supports, brushes, framing and storage, how to avoid creating art that self-destructs, and most importantly, how to protect yourself from exposure to hazardous materials.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Queer Studies (HSOC-211)

Introduces key concepts, theories and debates in queer studies; the course bridges a history of queer studies with contemporary social and cultural developments. We consider why queer theorists regard sexuality as socially constructed and focus on queer theorists' attempt to challenge heteronormative notions of "gender," "sex" and "sexuality." We discuss the concept of gender performativity, the impact of patriarchy and the position of transgender people vis a vis the queer community and pop culture. We trace the relationship between gay pride and shame and consider the role of the western model of gay identity in transnational queer and gender struggles. As a class group, we form an interpretive community to reconcile queer texts with issues of gender, race, sexuality and class that are pressingly current. We examine contemporary queerness and its relation to design, literature, film, culture and society.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Radical Green (HSCI-204)

RADICAL GREEN: PROBING THE EXTREMES OF ENVIRONMENTAL THOUGHT This course is designed to introduce students to some of the more extreme environmental philosophies, ethical concerns, and underlying perceptions of "wilderness," "wildness," and "nature" that have developed over the past hundred years. From John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and early twentieth-century conservation movements, to Deep Ecology and Earth First!, the course will attempt to unpack, explore, and redefine the varied assumptions and foundations of the contemporary sustainability issue and the greening of our present culture. Through readings and discussion, students will gain an understanding of these past and present schools of thought, and their related environmental movements, that have fundamentally challenged and shaped our notions about the role of the human in nature. Through the cultivation of critical environmental thinking skills, students will begin to construct their own philosophical approach and work on a course project that builds on the body of knowledge obtained throughout the term.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Radical Green (HSOC-204)

This course is designed to introduce students to some of the more extreme environmental philosophies, ethical concerns, and underlying perceptions of "wilderness," "wildness," and "nature" that have developed over the past hundred years. The course will attempt to unpack, explore, and redefine the varied assumptions and foundations of the contemporary sustainability issue and the greening of our present culture. Through readings and discussion, students will gain an understanding of these schools of thought and their related environmental movements, which have fundamentally challenged and shaped our notions about the role of the human in nature. Students will begin to construct their own philosophical approach and work on a course project that builds on the body of knowledge obtained throughout the term.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Readings in Fine Art (HNAR-321)

Re-Viewing Postmodernism: From Appropriation to Identity Politics to the Public Sphere. Because theories and definitions of postmodernism have relied heavily on advances in the arts, this course will consider what is at stake with this designation for the fine arts themselves. Since the term "postmodern" denotes neither a style nor a cohesive critical theory in itself, this course is primarily a summary of the main threads that have come to be tied up in this historical knot. The course will proceed thematically, rather than strictly chronologically, by highlighting paradigmatic methodologies that have come to define postmodernism in the realm of visual culture. This will be achieved by a thorough study of the central critical texts on postmodernism. Ultimately, we will consider the ways these various political and theoretical debates have been taken up by practicing artists, thus blurring the boundaries between politics, theory, and praxis.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Safe Agua, Develpmnt Smnr (HPRO-366)

With very strong partners, this is a unique opportunity for selected Safe Agua Colombia students to push the depth and pilot implementation of their projects. The previous Peru development seminar was an incredible educational experience for the ENV and Prod students involved, affording the chance to attend a NCIIA strategy-mapping workshop, and present to social innovation thought leaders at the NCIIA conference in San Francisco. The Seminar is what allowed both Balde a Balde and Giradora to move beyond the classroom, to garner $65k of grants, along with numerous Safe Agua awards, international lectures, and major publicity, and the creation of a new Social Enterprise lead by the students. The Spring 2014 Development seminar is a great opportunity to continue to push Safe Agua to make real world change. Objectives: _develop Safe Agua Colombia projects & prototypes _develop strategies for "think big / start small / grow fast" implementation _reach out to potential partners (Compartamos Colombia, etc) _writing essays for submission to awards & grants to support next stages of pilot testing and build international recognition _readings and research to support project development Enrollment by petition only.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Safe Agua: Research in Context (HSOC-366)

This course is a Humanities & Sciences co-requisite for the Safe Agua: Colombia project, designed to provide participating students with applied ethnographic research methods and fundamental social, economic, and political context for their fieldwork and design processes. Through a series of readings, activities, and discussions, students will gain a more comprehensive understanding of factors affecting water access and sanitation in the low-income settlements of Bogota, as well as the socio-political frameworks shaping water poverty in the Global South. Students will also develop a suite of ethical and reflective field research practices as part of their design process, and generate integrated visual, verbal, and written materials in response to their research experiences.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Science & Sustainability (HSCI-250)

Over the next hundred years, mankind will find itself in a life or death race: can we develop the technology needed to achieve a sustainable society before we deplete the earth's resources or irrevocably damage the environment? This course will explore the science of sustainability, including topics such as climate change, alternative energy, relationships between poverty and sustainability, and the future of the car.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Screenwriting (HNAR-337)

This course looks at the key elements that go into creating a successful screenplay, among them character, conflict, and three-act structure. Weekly writing exercises reinforce the information introduced in class, and film clips open up discussion about the good and the bad of screenwriting. Film business professionals who visit will add to students' knowledge base, and course take-aways.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Second Nature (HCRT-320)

The Humanities & Sciences component of the Second Nature TDS will take an in depth view of the critical and historical traditions of nature. In particular we will consider the intertwined realities of nature and media that is landscape, ranging from gardens to Google Earth. Topics may include: enclosure, survey, decay, westerns, gender, agro industry, wasteland and biomimetics among others. Students will be expected to read and write each week in conjunction with their studio practice.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Shakespeare Plays & Films (HNAR-290)

William Shakespeare is famous, but surprisingly, few Art Center students are familiar with his work--even though his plays are among the most important examples of the possibilities of narrative and drama, of character development, of psychological explorations, and of the dynamism of politics as it intersects history. Besides, the plays are exciting, funny, tragic, and incredibly entertaining. They just require some getting used to, and that is one of the goals of this course. During the semester we'll read two to four plays and see various film productions of each. We'll look into the plays as works of literature, and we'll explore the interpretations given to each play by actors and directors (to say nothing of editors, production designers, and others) as the literary genre is realized as drama. This course is of particular relevance to students in Film, Entertainment Design and Illustration. There will be a short exam on each play and an essay due at the end of the term. There may also be surprise guests.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Short Story (HNAR-301)

Students will learn a variety of short story techniques, including interior/dramatic monologue, letter narration, diary narration, memoir or observer narration, biography or anonymous narration, single character point of view and dual character/multiple character/no character point of view, with the goal of writing at least one finished short story during the term.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Start-Up 1.0: Venture (HENT-200)

In this course students will gain an understanding of how to launch a start-up venture and what it takes to succeed. They will learn how design entrepreneurs can leverage their talent into success, partnerships, and pitch for funding. Students will use the Business Canvas Model as a foundation to develop their start-up and create customer development through real world testing and feasibility. Students can use product designs, character based brands, online solutions and other ideas.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Sustainable Bldg Pract for Env (HSCI-254)

Environmental designers have increasingly been called upon to work with sustainable building practices by the client, the investor, and the commissioner. As a result, choices in material availability, energy type, water usage, water drainage, and fabrication methods have evolved, and new trends in environmental products and spatial designs have developed. This course will provide a historical overview of sustainable design practices as they relate to vernacular architecture and spatial environments ranging from micro-scaled building forms and interiors to macro-scaled landscapes and exterior building skins. Students will research and analyze the sustainability factor for a number of case studies while building a vocabulary and understanding of trends in sustainable building practices. Students will furthermore evaluate sustainable building practices through a variety of tools, including the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for products and the USGBC LEED accreditation system for buildings and neighborhoods.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Sustainable Bldg Pract for Env (HSOC-283)

Environmental designers have increasingly been called upon to work with sustainable building practices by the client, the investor, and the commissioner. As a result, choices in material availability, energy type, water usage, water drainage, and fabrication methods have evolved, and new trends in environmental products and spatial designs have developed. This course will provide a historical overview of sustainable design practices as they relate to vernacular architecture and spatial environments ranging from micro-scaled building forms and interiors to macro-scaled landscapes and exterior building skins. Students will research and analyze the sustainability factor for a number of case studies while building a vocabulary and understanding of trends in sustainable building practices. Students will furthermore evaluate sustainable building practices through a variety of tools, including the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for products and the USGBC LEED accreditation system for buildings and neighborhoods.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

TAMA: Cultural Explorations (HSOC-167)

In conjunction with the Pacific Rim 8 Studio "Influencing Dining: California Lifestyle," this class will explore different cultural histories and relationships between art, design, and food in the social, political, and diverse cultural contexts of Los Angeles and the US. It will feature artists working with food ecologies, including: Leslie Labowitz and her Sproutime project, from 70s performance to a major organic food business; the social practice of L.A. collective Fallen Fruit; and the philosophy and aesthetics of Gordon Matta-Clark's FOOD restaurant in 1970s NYC. We will take two field trips: one to the Sunday morning service at the African-American AME Church, including a soul food meal; another to Latino East Los Angeles in conjunction with our examination of the politics and history of latinos and food production. We will also look at the Persian diaspora in LA and its culinary culture, show films and videos, and hold a special Thanksgiving Feast and discuss its evolution. Art Center's Pacific Rim students are encouraged to participate along with TAMA students.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

TDS: Garden as Site (HHIS-374)

Humanities Component of Garden as Site: The Humanities component is designed to integrally support the objectives of the class, complimenting the major objectives in art or design work and the final projects and publication for the class. The Humanities faculty member will provide multiple in-class presentations addressing the history of various aspects of garden and landscape, will assign required readings, both for the class as a whole and individualized readings for particular projects, and will assist class participants with their written requirement for publication in the class journal. Additional short writing assignments will weave together reflections from course presentations, readings and personal research. Grading of the Humanities component of the class will be based on participants thoughtful and attentive participation in class discussions, presentations, required readings and written reflections, and the final text for the class journal. Con-current enrollment required: TDS-374 TDS: Gardens as Site.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

TDS:Text,Image & Written Word (HNAR-316)

This course is for advanced students, fifth term or higher, and has as its ultimate objective the production of a viable chapbook / zine. During the course of the semester, students will not only need to design and produce a book, but work with an editor and an author, read deeply into the text to find meaningful ways (as opposed to solely decorative ways) to graphically represent the text, and study the historical and literary ground from which the text comes as one way of discovering its meaning. In this way, we will begin to make solid connections between the graphic and the literary arts while embracing several departments, creating collaborative projects between writers and the practitioners of ACCD's various disciplines.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Take Product/Idea to Market (HENT-310)

This course will help the student entrepreneur learn how to start a business, sell a product, find their customers, create a market strategy, figure out how management thinks, gauge financial risk and rewards, and attract resources. Successful startups require demanding execution measured against a careful plan and strategy. This is not a studio course that generates a product or idea: this course is for those entrepreneurs who have an existing product, service, or idea and now want to take it to the next level, to launch a business or sell a solution to an established company.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

The 1960s: A Cultural History (HSOC-310)

An interdisciplinary exploration of the period from 1958-1972 - a revolutionary turning point in 20th century American culture, and how it laid the foundation for many of the current and future issues of the 21st century including media and technology, ecology and sustainability, and designing the future. This class about a series of events in time and space in the mid twentieth century in which a number of forces- political, social, cultural, technological, environmental, perceptual, intellectual, and generational - interface, collide, overlap, combust, fuse, and fracture. Some might say that the 60s actually begins in 1956 in Little Rock, Arkansas. Others might say it is with the election of John F. Kennedy in 1960, or more accurately with his assasination in November 1963. Likewise, it can be seen as coming to an end with either the election or the resignation of Richard M. Nixon 1974. Or ultimately, with the final departure from Vietnam in 1973. For many, 1968 was the the fork in the road, the place where the timeline split, the year in which possibilities for a different future were irrevocably lost, and the course of the future we are now living with was determined. The prologue and the epilogue are just as crucial to understanding the period as the hard lines of a numerical chronology. Thus it is best seen and understood through a series of transparent "maps" of the various terrains, laid one over the other, and the mindsets that shaped and altered them. As a seminar style class incorporating the visual and performing arts, literature, television, film, fashion, advertising, design, social and political movements, science and technology, we.will examine, analyze, and compare the diverse cultural output of the 1960s with critical insight into the creative, political, and social dynamics of the era, and its relevance to our current time and issues. Timelines and interdisciplinary presentation projects. Learning objectives/outcomes 1- To have a greater knowledge of the culture of the 60s, and its application to our present cultural environment, with a comprehension of the deeper meaning of innovative, experimental, and revolutionary thinking and creative concepts and processes within that context, and be able to apply it to future work. 2- An in-depth understanding of the complex interface between the avant-garde arts, communications media, and design within the larger social and political framework, and the ability to analyze, critique, and connect to contemporary issues. 3- The ability to raise questions about ethical issues and social consequences in media, the arts, design, technology, and how to apply that to current and future practice. 4 - Increased visual and cultural literacy and a greater awareness of its importance to the world social and political environment and the role of citizen designer in 21st century.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

The Business of Licensing (HENT-210)

For artists and designers who want to spend most of their time creating and less of their time on business issues licensing your work may be the right entrepreneurial career path for you. This course teaches the entire licensing process from putting together a licensing property, portfolio or program, picking the right licensors for your work, creating a licensing proposal and presentation, negotiating the deal, to managing successfully licensed artwork and products. Key creative content covered in the class include illustration, photography, graphic design, inventions, new products, new services, entertainment properties, character brands, print and digital publishing, brand licensing, and children's properties. Throughout the class each student will work on their own licensing project and strategy and create a final written proposal and presentation.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

The Design Professional (HBUS-200)

Communicating Your Professional Identity. Learn to represent yourself and your ideas clearly and confidently in a professional working environment. This course is ideal for those applying for internships or organizing job searches and interviews following graduation. Students will refine their resume and business correspondence to reflect their individual competitive strengths, as well as enhance communication skills as they relate to presentations, meetings, networking, and interviews. Additional topics include: personal positioning strategy, online presence, professional etiquette, compensation, and mentors. Guest lecturers with expertise in targeted areas of interest will be invited to share their experiences and review portfolios, and as time permits, field trips to local design groups may be scheduled.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

The Dream (HSCI-235)

This is a multi-disciplinary class about dreams, focusing on the science of sleep and dreaming, the structure of dreaming, and the way "dream logic" informs the work of writers, artists, and filmmakers. Students will learn about the physiology of sleep and sleep disorders, and about the neurology and phenomenology of dream content. We will discuss earlier ways of analyzing content (Freud), as well the contemporary scientific understanding of the narrative structure of dreams. We'll also see how artistic works can be accessed through the same methods that can be used in making meaning in dreams. Dreams create a sense or experience of meaning: how artists translate these dream experiences into artistic expressions will be a continuing theme throughout the course.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

The Evolution of Civil Rights (HSOC-330)

In this class we will cover what are your rights as an individual, as a member of a group, and even more specifically as an artist, designer and/or author. We will look at how these rights are articulated in the law and in social practice, and will look at how we got those rights. Guest lecturers, films and music will help us see how art, music, literature, poetry and activism lead to obtaining these civil rights. We'll also look at the threats and limitations to these rights in courts, in cities, in the workplace and in public and in private. As part of our discussions we will talk about civil rights in other countries and the current struggles around the world, and of course, at home. Course assignments will include reading articles, choices of books and poetry, watching and reviewing movies, listening to music from the formation of the United States until now all on the topic of defining, fighting for, defending and protecting the rights of individuals, minorities and groups in public and in private.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

The Films of India (HNAR-341)

This course is a comprehensive meta-generic study of the world's largest producers of films, India. The purpose of study is to consider the development of world cinema as well as examine topics of colonialism to globalization facing the nation, its varying regions, the world and the individual. Topics include an examination of India's film history paralleling European cinema of the 20th ca. and its development of genres, and following up to today's hyper-production of the mirror Hollywood imaging Bollywood. Issues facing the individual, gender and the multi-culture within will be considered as the country was colonized, and then how the country moved away from that space into achieving their own identity. In addition, we will study the new challenges and conflicts the country faced over the decades after independence and how it continues to play a vast role in the globalizing world. Some of the filmmakers we will study include Satyajit Ray, Ritwik Ghatak, Shyam Benegal, Mani Kaul, Mira Nair and Adoor Gopalakrishnan. In addition, the course will examine films of India's relationship to literature, art, and other cultural elements of India as it is explored in the variety of films selected. Along with lectures, the class will view and discuss a precise curation of India's films. Discussions, readings and research papers are organized to develop the student's interests in visual culture alongside their own developing visual production.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

The Graphic Novel (HNAR-382)

A close examination of the group of texts loosely labeled "graphic novels," in which verbal and visual language come together on the page toward a literary effect. Through study of comics and graphic novels themselves plus a number of critical texts--which examine comics development over time, and how they function both physically and thematically--this course investigates comics' specialized language and the possibilities of narrative in a medium so open, for a number of reasons, to experimentation.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

The Lab:sciences of the Unseen (HSCI-331)

The focus of this class will be about how to ask and scientifically answer questions about physical phenomena and to show how these techniques can be applied to your design practice. Scientists answer questions by taking a big idea and distilling it down to simple questions that can be explored via experimentation. There are two broad categories of science: confirmatory and exploratory. Confirmatory science tests a particular hypothesis, whereas exploratory science searches for a hypothesis. Final projects will seek to test or explore a question related to your practice.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Theory of Structure (HSCI-205)

This course offers a survey of the role of structure as a foundation of successful design. As a practical concept, structure embraces many design parameters: form, function, cost, durability, and manufacturability. From a theoretical standpoint, however, understanding and predicting how these parameters interact requires knowledge of details from the disparate fields of physics, engineering, materials science, and history, among others. This course will explore these complex relationships by introducing definitions, methods, and analytical techniques complimented by a more historical perspective on the function of structure. Case studies in the lessons of structural failure will illustrate how cutting-edge design must, at times, balance on a knife's edge, and how such daring might be safely and dependably accomplished in the future.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Transportation Histories (HHIS-282)

This course will examine transportation as a multi-dimensional activity with historical, social, political, economic, and environmental importance. The class structure will consist of seminar-style engagements, critical examination of relevant literature and media, writing and analysis, and planned field trips. The curriculum has been organized chronologically and thematically to engage students in a discussion of the various modes of transport, by land, water, and air, as indispensible in the production of culture. The students will investigate the role transportation has played in the rise of civilizations, development of societies, as well as nation building, national unity, and individual identity. Also examined will be transportation as a factor both shaping economic activities and being shaped by them, and the environmental costs of transportation will be addressed in terms of current sustainability concerns.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Type + Authorship (HNAR-365)

On day one students conjure, discuss, and write their way into a book of collective thematic interest. We then create and curate a supporting archive of suggested texts, images, film as research around the theme to find an editorial tone for the publication. Every week through the course of the first month we write deeper and fine-tune. Then the drawing begins. This class functions as a multi-disciplinary studio environment to draw, photograph, illustrate, and graphically impregnate a ripe topic (like hair, animals, the encyclopedia). It's about speed and follow-through, dedication to an idea. Writing in class, writing at home, rewriting, editing, analyzing. Developing new collaborative skills and trust. Students not only produce original writing and images but also learn how to work with secondary writing like a preface, captions, titling, colophon, marginalia; how to curate an overall tone for content; how to construct a narrative sequence; how to copy edit and proof. All read selected works out loud in a final crit.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Urban Anthropology (HSOC-110)

This course will introduce the study of cities and city life from an anthropological perspective (e.g., how people, from elites to prostitutes, survive in cities; how cities visually reflect globalization; how gangs and churches both help poor people survive). By the end of the course the students should be able to identify characteristics of cities cross-culturally and demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness between the institutions of urban life and the lives of city dwellers. The emphasis will be on cities as systems that guide our lives and our responses to them.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Urban Leviathans: Opulence (HSOC-290)

Urban Leviathans: Opulence, Struggle, and Squalor in the Majority World will explore 21st-century urban extremes, from the globalized metropolitan region to the almost schizoid characteristics of what we once called the "developing" or "third world" but must now refer to as the "majority world"--the fast-growing cities located in or situated near the 10/40 Window. This course will provide a wide range of understandings about the nature of "majority" cities including, but not limited to, a study of the ecological ramifications of urban growth, varied security issues, the complexities of urban life, and the politics of plunder keeping stable governments from taking hold. This course is important for Art Center students, because it can give them a better sense of the non-western city in a rapidly changing, globalized context; it should help students understand urban life and many of the political, ecological, and social struggles taking shape in this majority world that we often find easy to ignore.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Visual Anthropology (HSOC-111)

An examination of visual culture and its representation by anthropologists. The course will look at universal meanings behind common visual symbols as well as the main patterns of difference between types of cultures. Throughout the course, videos made by anthropologists about other cultures will show the history of change in representation and the meaning of exotic visual symbols to Western culture as a whole.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Visual Math (HSCI-201)

This course debunks topics usually called "mathematical" by revealing their use in other fields, with a particular focus on those concepts that have a visual bent (geometrical, cultural, textual). Lectures are each built around a concept drawn from the field of mathematics that connects to other subject areas: classical and modern visual arts, economics, science (astronomy, physics), music, optics (color, lenses), and numerical studies (infinities, "special" numbers, mystical preconceptions, "unexplainable" phenomena). A goal of the course is to demonstrate these manifold connections, but also to uncover that which is compelling about mathematical concepts; special attention is given to those concepts that have "unexplained beauty." All mathematical skill required for analytical techniques will be taught in the course.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

WS Placement (HWRI-WS)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

WS:I Placement (HWRI-WSI)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Wet Paint TDS (HCRT-342)

What's the significance of painting as an art? We'll begin by discussing it as a triangulated force-field: One corner comprises the intentions of the artist who creates the painting; a second comprises the expectations of the beholder who views the painting; and a third comprises the unique demands of paint itself. These three vertices are connected by a long history of painterly practice, punctuated by theoretical attempts to understand, promote, and exploit both painting and its practitioners. We'll explore these powerful connections in an attempt to discover the center (or centers) of the painting-triangle. Special emphasis will be placed on the state of painting today. Expect a substantial amount of academic homework. Students will be asked to read texts each week, write responses to what they read, integrate their thinking with their practice-and, above all, get wet. This Humanities & Sciences course is an integrated co-requisite to the Studio Wet Paint TDS. CO-REQUISITE: TDS-342

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

World Hist/Digital Humanities (HSOC-292)

Digital archives and libraries across the world make available sources that have enhanced how we learn subjects and make things. In this course, students work collaboratively to build digital history exhibits on curated topics in 20th-century world history. To do digital history is to create a framework through technology for people to explore sources and follow a narrative on a historical problem. Students select exhibit topics from a list, and prepare for content development with general class readings in world history. A media designer will advise on interface concept. The final exhibits will have completed curatorial content, including texts and database of artifacts, and an interface sketch. No media production is required. This is a humanities/social sciences course with a design component.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

World Hist/Digital Humanities (HHIS-292)

Digital archives and libraries across the world make available sources that have enhanced how we learn subjects and make things. In this course, students work collaboratively to build digital history exhibits on curated topics in 20th-century world history. To do digital history is to create a framework through technology for people to explore sources and follow a narrative on a historical problem. Students select exhibit topics from a list, and prepare for content development with general class readings in world history. A media designer will advise on interface concept. The final exhibits will have completed curatorial content, including texts and database of artifacts, and an interface sketch. No media production is required. This is a humanities/social sciences course with a design component.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Writing About Art (HNAR-322)

The course is designed to help students develop a level of proficiency and confidence with tools for writing about art, especially their own.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Writing Studio (HWRI-102)

This course is tailored to Art Center students and promotes fluency in the discourses of art and design as well as overall critical thinking skills. Most course readings address topics in art, design, or consumer culture. The assignments ask students to write in a range of contexts, make oral presentations, review grammar as needed, and build design-related vocabulary. Over the semester each student will complete a variety of exercises that support the writing and revision of three to four essays. The "intensive" version of the class provides additional support for student efforts with an extra two hour section each week.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Writing Studio: Intensive (HWRI-101)

This course is tailored to Art Center students and promotes fluency in the discourses of art and design as well as overall critical thinking skills. Most course readings address topics in art, design, or consumer culture. The assignments ask students to write in a range of contexts, make oral presentations, review grammar as needed, and build design-related vocabulary. Over the semester each student will complete a variety of exercises that support the writing and revision of three to four essays. The "intensive" version of the class provides additional support for student efforts with an extra two hour section each week.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Writing for Video Games (HNAR-311)

Video games are unlike any other storytelling medium; their greatest strength--interactivity--poses unique challenges (and opportunities) for a writer. In this course, we will work to analyze and identify what works and what doesn't in writing for video games, and apply that knowledge to create compelling worlds and stories for a player. We will examine both the direct functions (e.g. dialogue), and the indirect functions (reflected in the pacing, design, and gameplay) of writing for the medium, with a focus on practical application of storytelling as pertains specifically to video games. At the end of the class, students will present an original video game concept and story, along with key art and an explanation of game mechanics, and discuss how it all fits together. Overall familiarity with "video games" in the collective sense is a must.

Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam
Course Credit: 3

Writing the Cable Drama (HNAR-314)

The future is upon us and the future is high quality cable dramas. Shows like True Detective, The Wire, and Mad Men have ushered in what is being called the 2nd golden age of television. These shows are filled with deeply layered stories, unforgettable characters, lush art direction, and cinematic presentations that have made cable the go to destination for consumers and creators. Writing The Cable Drama prepares Art Center students to become part of this exploding field by guiding them through all the steps of creating a marketable pilot and ancillary materials for a one-hour cable drama. Students who successfully complete this course can build a series from the ground up. They can talk fluently about story structure, dramatic writing, the elements of a pilot, and produce all the necessary material to pitch and sell a one-hour cable drama. Class products include: an original one-hour drama script, series bible, format and tone book.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

   
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