GO
Art Center College of Design | Pasadena, California | Learn to Create. Influence Change.
woodshop main_gallery so_campus_courtyard

ART

 

Academic Independent Study (AGA-975)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Alternative Projections (AGA-621)

In this class we will attend the PST screenings run by Cinefamily and FilmForum. Weekly events are taking place all over LA for the next 6 months. Most will be on Sundays, though for the month of January we must be flexible as there will be screenings on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. We have room for 9 students on the class. We will car pool to screenings - which are held at the Egyptian, Cinefamily on Fairfax and MoCA. Please look at the screening line-up on the web-site: http://alternativeprojections.com/screening-series / The class runs 14 weeks and requires that you attend at least 10 out of our 12 screenings and both of our discussion sessions. There will be a five-page paper due at the end of the term.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Art & Film Intensive (AGA-559)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Art History and Its Double (AGA-581)

The classic slide-show history of Western Art was taught to me by my art history professors at NYU and now I'm going to teach it to you. We'll start with the Venus of Willendorf and Lascaux, and move to the Egyptians and beyond. The textbook for the class is H.W. Janson's History of Art. The smooth trajectory of art as it was constructed by Janson will be interrupted every 4 weeks by a visiting lecturer who will deconstruct the history as it has been written, understood and memorized since art history was invented by German historians in the mid-19th Century. In addition to those interruptions, essays by Meyer Schapiro will be distributed to offer another perspective on the notion of "style" in art and to increase the complexity and richness of this history. You must take this class if you suffer from three or more of the following conditions: - You have never studied the formal history of art - You don't know the difference between a pyramid and a mastaba - You don't know what or where the Fertile Crescent is - You can't define "sfumato" - You can't tell the difference between Gothic and Renaissance cathedrals - You don't know who Palladio is - You've never read Baudelaire - You can't tell the difference between Russian Constructivism and de Stijl - You have no clue what Clement Greenberg was on about - You think Warhol invented Pop - You want to know about what happened when and try to figure out what it means to you and your work Get the book new or used in hardcover or softcover and bring it with you on the first day of class: http://www.amazon.com/Jansons-History-Art-Western- Tradition/dp/0131934554

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Art History to the Revolution (AGA-584)

This class will be co-taught by Diana Thater and Jason Smith. It is comprised of eight classes with Diana Thater, four lectures with Jason Smith and two with Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe. This is an art "history" class (emphasis on the quotation marks) where both objects and texts will be examined. Diana Thater will teach the objects and Jason Smith and Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe will teach the texts. We will work through a chronology of Western art objects from the Greeks to 1789. 1789 to the present is Part 2 of this class and will be offered in Fall 2010. The objects section of the class will be held in Los Angeles museums. At the Getty, the Norton-Simon or LACMA, we will look at and discuss individual artworks; what they are, how they are made, what they were meant for when they were made and what we use them for now. Are they cultural curiosities or are they still allowed to, and are they capable of, bringing ideas into the world? We will also engage with a series of texts--theoretical, philosophical, historical--dating from the 17th century up to the 20th century. We will consider, for example the way in which a German philosophical tradition stretching from Lessing to Worringer via Hegel considers the historico-philosophical importance of the Greek conception of art. In turn, we'll read a series of important French texts dating from the foundation of the Academy in the mid-17th century (with discussions ranging from the relation between design and color, structure and surface, as well as the hierarchy of genres and the political implications governing this hierarchy) and continuing right up to the threshold of the French revolution. NOTE: This class will be a 5-hour class when we go to museums and a 3-hour class when we have lectures at school. A syllabus will be provided the first day of class. Get the book new or used in hardcover or softcover and bring it with you on the first day of class: http://www.amazon.com/Jansons-History-Art-Western- Tradition/dp/0131934554

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Art and Philosophy (AGA-507)

This class will discuss the relationship between art and philosophy in the work of eight philosophers from Plato and Aristotle, through Kant and Hegel, to Deleuze. Students will write short papers, probably for presentation to the rest of the class, on specific aspects of the material under discussion.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Art and the End of Work (AGA-517)

This course will examine the concepts of production, productivity and non-productivity from three different perspectives: philosophy, politics and art. We will begin with a recent text by the artist Josef Strau on 147the nonproductive attitude148 as a starting-point for a reflection that will wind back to the Hegelian and Marxist theories of labor, work and production. The course will begin with an examination of Hegel146s famous master-slave dialectic, then transition to Marx146s analysis of productivity and non-productivity, reproductive and unproductive labor within the capitalist mode of production. We146ll extend the Hegelian constellation of terms through a series of thinkers from the 20th century whose work is devoted to the themes of 147useless148 negativity and the 147inoperative148 (Bataille, Blanchot, Nancy), while countering the Marxist reflection with a philosophical and political tradition that sees the 147essence148 of the human no longer in labor (the human as the production of itself through the production of its conditions of existence) but in the resistance to or refusal of work (Lafargue, Debord, Autonomist Marxism). Finally, we will use this general framework to examine with some specificity these questions within the context of art history and artistic practices, beginning with Baudelaire and passing from Constructivism and Productivism to the Situationists, passing through a certain strain of Minimalism, and concluding with two contemporary fields of artistic practice, so-called relational aesthetics and the 147Cologne148 model that Josef Strau146s text can be said to represent.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Art/Culture (AGA-568)

This courses will treat the relation between art and culture in the 20th century via three approaches: art as art, art as culture, culture as culture. The class will consist in a series of readings and presentations, as well as trips off site to experience and discuss works of art firsthand.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Art/Policits (AGA-561)

In this class we will look at the complex relations between art and politic from different perspectives. Jason Smith's section of the class will be structured along selected texts by Carl Schmitt, Alain Badiou, Jacques Ranci232re and Guy D233bord. Walead Beshty will revisit the ready-made and discuss the allegorical as one if not the most valid model of critique within the limits of the art institution, reading include: Craig Owens, Benjamin H.D. Buchloh, Peter B252rger, Michel de Certeau and Claude Levi-Strauss. Annette Weisser will look at different artistic methodologies to "aquire world147 such as map making, history painting, visual reportage and reenactment. Artists whose work will be considered include:Bureau d'etudes, 214yvind Fahlstr246m, Mark Lombardi, Grupo de Arte Callejero,Francisco Goya, Andreas Siekmann, Theodore G233ricault, Diego Rivera, J246rg Immendorf, Dierk Schmidt, Peter Watkins, Jeremy Deller, Harun Farocki, Joris Ivens, Jean-Luc Godard, Walid Raad/ The Atlas Group.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Artist's Body in Performance (AGA-521)

The Artist's Body in Performance, Installation & Video This Seminar will present a loose history of performance from the end of World War II to the present, examining historical and contemporary conceptions of what the body can do and has done in various spaces and contexts, as well as the relationship of the medium to other forms of art. Much of this is in the form of festivals, cd ROMs, magazines, DVDs, streaming internet. Slides, videos, magazines, books of artists? works past and present will be presented and discussed as part of each class. This seminar will have the opportunity to investigate performances as they happen throughout Los Angeles, whether, street, club, museum, gallery, etc Key artists to be considered include but are not limited to: the Viennese Actionists, General Idea, Black Market, Valie Export, Marina Abramovic, Hanna Wilke, and Chris Burden. Mariko Mori, Vanessa Beecroft, Kieth Boadwee, Tania Bruguera, Pipoliti Rist, Patty Chang, Olig Kulik, Peter Land, etc.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Arts Stars & Rats (AGA-537)

This advanced-level course will survey the situation of and relations between art and California, with particular emphasis on cultural production in Los Angeles, from the late 1960s to recent times. We will engage various media, but special attention will be given to the moving image. Do terms such as "alternative" and "highbrow" culture hold any traction when mainstreaming and the instantaneity of the digital have rendered such pursuits almost moot? From the Ferus Gallery and the landmark Marcel Duchamp retrospective in Pasadena, from Andy Warhol, Fred Halsted, Morgan Fisher, Kathryn Bigelow, and the Simpsons, to Frances Stark, Michele O'Marah, George Kuchar, and Paul Sietsema, we will track how the local and regional maintain despite the onslaught of global capital.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Aspects of the "Real" (AGA-540)

This course will provide focused discussion and thinking about the "real," its relation to sexuality, desire, and eroticism and to the production of images and writing. The main text for the course will be Lydia Davis's novel, The End of the Story, with additional shorter critical essays. We will use Davis's novel to spur critical analysis and to accompany discussion of Pasolini's Comizi d'amore and Fassbinder's Berlin Alexanderplatz. Students will guide and lead discussions at every juncture, making participation mandatory and a critical presentation to the class expected.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Beware of a Holy Whore (AGA-566)

Although as much about downtime and drift as anything else (say, filmmaking), Fassbinder's Beware of a Holy Whore, 1971, provokes consideration of artistic production in relation to sex, materials, and economics, not to mention thinking about how any artist acknowledges (and abuses) his or her predecessors as well as peers. Simultaneously writer and director of the film, Fassbinder played one of its leads, casting himself as the quick-tempered production manager of the film within the film. Often taken as an after-the-fact "documentary" of the travails endured by everyone involved on a previous Fassbinder shoot, Beware of Holy Whore catalyzes, through the distancing of "fiction," the kinds of "whoring" entailed in the making of art. As Fassbinder stated: "It's true the film is about making a film, but the actual theme is how a group works and how leadership positions emerge and get worked out. And this theme, viewed objectively, is pretty important." The course is divided into three sections, each organized around a film that engages (both extending and thwarting) such "pretty important" themes. We will use Fassbinder's Holy Whore as a promiscuous device to engage how the art system works and how its leadership positions emerge and get worked out, particularly in relation to historical precedent and contemporary cultural modes and social conditions. The second section of the course will begin with a negotiation of Werner Schroeter's Der Tod der Maria Malibran (The Death of Maria Malibran), 1972, which, deranges the senses, narrative, as well as "live" and "dead" bodies. Idiosyncratic and "personal" aesthetics in relation to-versus?-the mainstream and/or dominant ones will be examined via groups and individuals who borrowed from so-called "popular" and institutionalized culture. For the final, third section, we will use Spike Jonze and Charlie Kaufman's Adaptation, 2002, to begin a discussion of adaptation to or refusal of (adaptation to as refusal of?) "Hollywood," a word shorthanding creativity downwind from big B. O. (Box Office). Celebrity, social class, fashion by way of "relational aesthetics," pornography, as well as notions of "post-Empire"-topics recapitulating, albeit in a wayward register, most of the concerns raised by Holy Whore-acclimate the "artistic" to the contingency and/or onslaught of 24/7 mediazation, with Charlie Sheen in the role as a better-meaning, debilitated and debilitating-James Franco. A coda on words and silence, on the potential nontranslatability and illegibility of the moment, despite constant verbiage (whether blogs, Twitter, or "liking"), concludes our studies. Availing itself of a variety of kinds and genres of writing/thinking, the course is organized to reflect upon the categorical differences and/or slippages between the art historical, philosophical, essayistic, feminist, Marxist, and "poetic"; such variety attempts to question the pieties of what normally comes to stand for "theory" as well as "smarts" under the sign of the aesthetic. The artist as well as specific objects and objections of art ("discrete," but not ignoring the "discreet") determine all the course's intellectual proceedings: a written and presentational component of the course will emphasize this determination. After breaking the class participants into groups of three, each group will be asked to nominate, moderate and argue for self-selected objects/interests it considers "different" or contrapuntal to the aesthetic status quo, paying heed to how that difference is recognized and/or talked about, whether the differences are marked as "aesthetic" and "non-aesthetic," "useful" or "not useful," etc. We will wish to hone the ways to explore if such dialectics of difference are possible or worthwhile, why and why not. Since it may be the holiest and most whorish of whores to beware of, so-called "critique" here becomes a cautionary tale.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Brand America:Andy Warhol (AGA-563)

This is a survey of key matters Warholian as they continue to influence contemporary culture and thinking. It will focus on looking, thinking about and reflecting upon art objects and the systems they move in.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Cinema in Revltn: Debord's Flm (AGA-549)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Completed Thesis (AGA-700)

A Pass in this course means the student has submitted the thesis and the thesis has been approved by the department. This is the final requirement for graduation.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Considering Documentary (AGA-523)

Starting with Frederick Weismann and Werner Herzog as divergent examples, we will examine the contemporary documentary, considering the problem of verite filmmaking, but also questions of style and subject. How is the subject formed and, in turn, revealed? How does style impact the subject and the author. A different project will be viewed and discussed each week, including a number of recently made films. Students will be asked to write a page or two about each project, to be turned in at intervals during the term.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Crash Theory (AGA-546)

This class will be a "crash course" introducing students to the philosophy of Alain Badiou, widely considered the most important living philosopher in the world. The purpose of the course is both to present the fundamental principles and orientation of Badiou's work as well as to prepare students for Alain Badiou's visit and lecture on December 2 (in Graduate Seminar). The first three classes will meet for three hours and discuss selected readings from Badiou's work. A final class will discuss the content of Badiou's December 2 lecture. Students will be expected to read these texts closely, and be prepared to write a short text about Badiou, due December 12.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 1

Difficult Women & Others (AGA-620)

"Remember to work in obscurity and never have your first film become a giant hit because then you are in trouble and in danger of being a major flash-in-the-plan. Become a big soft plop-in-the-bowl, but create such a stink with your picture that people cannot ignore it. Things that stink become even more potent with age, and therefore, your plop will create ever-widening concentric rings and reverberate throughout the ages. Also, if you are out of the spotlight for most of your career there will be no need to spray hair on your head if your scalp decides to call it quits and to shed its mantle of insulation. Likewise, you can avoid fat farms and diets because no one really cares what an unsuccessful person looks like. But remember to make your commercial failures interesting and creative expressions of your shortcomings." -George Kuchar, from Reflections in a Cinematic Cess Pool A careful study of the works of four artists and writers: George Kuchar, Gertrude Stein, Lee Lozano, and Harpo Marx. In the course, we will be dwelling on the forms questions (thinking) can take as well as bodies (and artistic careers) in revolt.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Ephemeral Art Working Group (AGA-515)

In this 3-week course we will look at works of ephemeral art made from 1955-1970. We will concentrate on art made from the elements: Earth, air, fire and water. The works we will look at were not made to last or even to leave behind a relic that could be exhibited or sold. They are documented in photography, film and video. We will look at documentation of artworks by Zero Group, Fluxus, and Earth Artists. We will read manifestos and texts by the artists. Each class will be a lecture followed by discussion. At the completion of the class each student is required to have made a work of ephemeral art. We will gather outside of class time to look at the works when and as they happen. Artists to be studied: Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, Yves Klein, Lucio Fontana, Piero Manzoni, Robert Barry, Yoko Ono, Dennis Oppenheim, Robert Smithson, Yayoi Kusama..

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 1

Film & Video Tech Lab (AGA-505)

A production lab for the student who has little or no experience with film and video. Learn how to use production equipment, post-production analog video editing bay, and become literate in terms of shot structure and editing techniques and strategies.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Film & Video Workshop (AGA-504)

Students make and analyze film and video in order to help them formulate and understand a variety of orientations to the moving image.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Films of Huillet and Straub (AGA-536)

In a 1975 interview with Robert Schoen, after acknowledging an acute statement of Gilles Deleuze in relation to their films - "Art is resistance against communication." - Jean-Marie Straub went on to comment, "I think this is true - at least as a provocation, if not more.We knew exactly that our films, each of them, was a little war machine against Esperanto." In this course, we will watch several films of Huillet/Straub from all moments in their collaborative career; each film will be watched twice at different points in the term. Essays on the filmmakers as well as on topics related to their endeavors (modernism, politics, and landscape, among others); Pedro Costa's film about Huillet and Straub, O? g?votre sourire enfoui? (2001), which he has described as "anti-Straubian"; and a few literary texts engaged with Huillet/Straub's work will complement the analysis and viewing of the films. A viewing diary will be required as one of the written components of the class.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Grad Art Elecitve Cnv Course (AGA-350)

for conversion use only

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Graduate Photo Workshop (GSA-505)

5 week mini-workshop for artists working in photography or who use photo discourses within their work. Historical through contemporary work & current ideas about historical works. Lectures/discussions/crit

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 2

Graduate Seminar (AGA-554)

This course is a visiting lecture series held weekly in the evening in conjunction with the Graduate Fine Art program. Guests include internationally recognized artists, critics, art historians, architects, filmmakers, writers from Los Angles and around the globe. The course is mandatory every term.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Guy Debord's Socty of Spectcl (AGA-548)

This reading group will be devoted to the study of Guy Debord's 1967 book, Society of the Spectacle. Participants in the group will be asked to lead discussions of specific chapters of the book as well as produce one 5 pp. analysis or commentary of a particular aspect of Debord's book. In addition to Debord's text, we will also discuss, where relevant, passages from Marx, Hegel, Feuerbach and others. The goal of this class is to provide an occasion for committed study of an important document in the history of avant-garde and left political thought. Participants will finish the group with a command of Debord's concepts and their relevance (or irrelevance) to contemporary art, culture and politics. This group is particularly recommended for those contemplating taking the Fall 2011 class on Debord's films.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Guy Debord, Cinema (AGA-538)

...consumed by fire: Guy Debord, Cinema, and the Devil's Party We enlisted irrevocably in the Devil's party - the "historical evil" that leads existing conditions to their destruction, the "bad side" that makes history by undermining all established satisfaction. This course will undertake an evaluation of the work of Guy Debord, from his early participation in the Lettrist movement to his final autobiographical Panegryique. Though this course intends to address as wide a range of topics and problems as possible, it will use his cinematic works as the point of departure for an assessment of both the historical and theoretical context his work intervenes in, as well as the relevance (or irrelevance) of his body of work for contemporary reflections on both politics and artistic practice. While we will devote considerable time to a reading of Debord146s well-known 1967 Society of the Spectacle as well as key texts from his Situationist International phase151including readings of key philosophical texts, such as those by Rousseau, Feuerbach and Marx, that shed light on the "sources" of Debord146s conceptual frameworks151we will also attempt to take some distance from this phase of the work, with the hope of providing a more complex sense of his work than is usually offered presented, particularly in art theoretical discussions. Debord146s cinematic works, though often referred to in passing, have been the subject of very little sustained analysis (only one long essay, by Thomas L. Levin, has done so). This is due in part to Debord146s decision to forbid the screening of his films for many years. In February 2009, however, a first American retrospective of his films will be presented. While our course will privilege the cinematic work in general as a key to a reading his corpus as a whole, it will in turn use one specific film as the starting point for our own reflections, namely his final film, In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni, whose palindromic Latin roughly reads as "We go round in circles in the night, and are consumed by fire." Starting from this film, first shown in 1978, we will return to his earliest film, Howls in Favor of Sade (1952) and proceed roughly chronologically, up to his death in 1995.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Into the Universe of Tech Imag (AGA-550)

Into the Universe of Technical Images is a seminar organized around Vil?Flusser's book of the same title, which elaborates on key concepts proposed in his Toward a Philosophy of Photography: that technical images have superseded words as the dominant way in which we represent the world to ourselves and, as such, they are governed by the programs of apparatuses that tend to be indifferent to human intention. This text will be augmented by readings from Friedrich Kittler's sweeping historical work, Optical Media, as well as Alexander Galloway's "The Interface Effect," Mackenzie Wark's writings on "Telesthesia" and Sian Ngai's Affect Theory.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Is Art Possible After Google? (AGA-565)

How should we gauge the impact of the Internet on contemporary art? Does the advent of Web-based image aggregators and curatorial platforms (e.g. Pinterest, Contemporary Art Daily, thejogging.tumblr.com, #ArtSelfie) spell doom for the art profession, or at least, for its traditional institutions and markets? Or, to adopt a more optimistic perspective, have the databases, online archives, and retail networks of Web 2.0 revitalized the methods and materials available to contemporary artists, enabling universal access to supply chains and data flows? In this class, we will seek to understand the practical challenges posed to artists (and also critics, curators, spectators) by the omnipresent Web; we will also consider the "post-internet" condition in terms of the larger historical trajectory of modernism and its antecedents.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Jacques Ranciere (AGA-539)

The theme of the class will be that of "Aesthetic Education," a philosophical and political program first proposed by Friedrich Schiller in the last decade of the 18th century and the subject of Ranci?'s recent innovative work on the relation between aesthetics and politics. For Ranci?, politics is not primarily the exercise or struggle for power but the institution of a certain type of space and time, a mode of visibility and intelligibility that creates a tear in the consensual fabric of a given form of collective life. Under certain circumstances, art can institute just such a space and time, in which the fundamental polarities of experience-activity and passivity, form and matter, appearance and reality?are suspended and transformed. Friedrich Schiller's Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man offers, according to Ranci?, an unsurpassed model for the construction of a space of non-domination, of "free play"; the aesthetic education of man, in turn, is nothing less than a program for an "aesthetic revolution," "a revolution of sensible existence." The readings for this class will include several key texts by Jacques Ranci? devoted to aesthetic, pedagogy and politics.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

L.A. - Art & Culture (AGA-569)

Los Angeles, get ready for your close-up. This advanced-level course will use LA as actuality and myth in art made in California since the late 1960s. Intense focus will be given to how artists have used and responded to their proximity to the Hollywood movie and television industries.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Making Sense of Process (AGA-556)

An artistic process, like a language, generates new meaning as it moves, as it is augmented, adjusted, formed and reformed. It is always inclined toward the possible, in form and in meaning, and there lies its potential relevance. What is artistic relevance other than the fleeting coherence of new form and meaning? For the artist focused on process and possibility, however, this coherence may be in part a distraction. It may direct attention too much to artistic end or product, indeed, too much to the seductions of meaning writ large. At such moments meaning may have to be moved aside and the good sense of process put in its place. This sense is often difficult to keep in one's grasp. Our class will focus on it, on its possibilities and its difficulties, and how our own creativity and subjectivity can adapt to different kinds of making, learning and meaning through process. The class will focus on current and historical practices based on letting go of control, authorship-and perhaps ego-or the established forms we're used to. We will study alternative processes of making, collaborating and thinking through Dada, Surrealism, Situationism, Fluxus and other more contemporary modes. The class will require weekly readings, studio critiques, class presentations by students and faculty, and participation through group discussion. Most importantly, we will concentrate on making sense through making art and through learning how others have done and are doing so.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 6

Master's Project 1 (GSA-501)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 6

Master's Project 2 (GSA-502)



Prerequisite: GSA-501 Masters Project 1 Required
Course Credit: 6

Master's Project 3 (GSA-551)



Prerequisite: Take GSA-502;
Course Credit: 6

Master's Project 4 (GSA-552)



Prerequisite: TAKE GSA-551;
Course Credit: 6

Master's Project 5 (GSA-601)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 9

Master's Project 6 (GSA-602)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 9

Master's Thesis 5 (AGA-601)



Prerequisite: TAKE GSA-552;
Course Credit: 6

Master's Thesis 6 (AGA-651)



Prerequisite: TAKE AGA-601;
Course Credit: 6

Master's Thesis Meetings (AGA-652)

This course will consist of individual meetings between 5th term Grad Art candidates, their thesis committee readers, and the academic faculty in order to support appropriate development of the written final thesis prior to candidates' final term.

Prerequisite: TAKE AGA-601;
Course Credit: 3

Master's Thesis Prep (AGA-617)

This workshop involves the development of the written thesis that will accompany each student's thesis show. Student's will be required to submit their own writing as well as participate in group discussions. This workshop is limited to and mandatory for all M5 students.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Materialism and Form (AGA-530)

In his recently translated The Future of the Image, Jacques Ranci232re146s states his suspicion of contemporary discourses and artistic practices that would abandon the internal complexity of the image in order to 147deduce the forms of identity and alterity peculiar to images from the properties of apparatuses of production and diffusion.148 That a materialist philosopher would insist on the irreducibility of the image and its form to its material (or, increasingly, immaterial) support and its process of production and distribution is telling. If in much art of the last century151from Constructivism to Frank Stella and after151the internal structure of the image was 147deduced148 (Fried uses this term) from the nature of the materials used or the shape of the image's support, today much work championed as political151so-called media interventions, for example151consists of images completely determined by transformations within technologies of productive and 147distributive media.148 Instead of a conflictual, dialectical synthesis between surface and support, these deductive processes seem to settle the score in one direction, reducing the formal structure and phenomenal force of the image to a mere logical result of its material infrastructure, its causes (material, final, effective) and technical conditions. This course will address the concepts of Form and Matter (and their variants, formalism and materialism, materiality, the 147immaterial148 and so on) in rigorously philosophical terms while continuously keeping our eye on specifically aesthetic questions. Readings might include: Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Heidegger, Deleuze, Gottfried Semper, Alois Riegl and Wilhelm Worringer, contemporary theories of 147immaterial148 labor, a discussion of Constructivism and Soviet film theory and a cross-section of 147recent148 art theoretical discussions, from the 1950s to the present. Our task will be to develop a materialist theory of aesthetic forms that refuses to reduce these forms to the mere result of a logical, deductive or ideal process, to effects of their technical and social conditions, or to the actualization of already articulated possibles.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Meetings with Visiting Artist (AGA-502)

Students meet with a different professional artist each semester.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 1

Negotng Hist & Thry n Cntmp A (AGA-532)

In this course, we will examine the concept of narrative within a variety of forms. Engaging with a diversity of topics - including the novel, the epistolary, painting, theatre, film, music and dance, the core of this class will be the analysis of narrative structures and the manner in which they convey meaning. Students will be encouraged to consider narrative as an essential part of ones experience of the universe, and thus an invaluable tool at the ready for artists of any ilk, irrespective of time period or media.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Neurons Sparking (AGA-671)

With neuroscientists blazing the trail to understanding the neurobiology of human perception and computational technologists crunching the numbers to create new means of neuroimaging, artists are compelled to ask new and different kinds of questions about their own engaged process of looking, seeing and doing. Pivoting on the Allosphere research conducted by the Art, Media and Technology team at UC Santa Barbara, Neurons Sparking! introduces students to the continuum of intellectual and art histories and theories that enrich today's art and biotech practices. Strong consideration will be given to the early modern artists -- Monet, Seurat, Cezanne --in light of their interests in science and technology of their day. To ground our discussion in contemporary context, we will visit the Allosphere and with our minds and brains challenged by new research into synesthesia and computational abstraction, we take up an informed discussion of perception in 21c. Additional viewing will include works by artists who currently reinvestigate perception from phenomenological and neuro-aesthetic points of view. Course readings will include works by key authors, past and present: Kant, Bergson, James, Ramachandran, Zeki, Varela, Le Doux and Stafford.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Our Aesthetic Categories (AGA-545)

This seminar will be structured around Sianne Ngai's recent book Our Aesthetic Categories which proposes that our era is dominated by three feeling-based judgements that are remote from the classical ones of the Beautiful and the Sublime: Cute, Interesting and Zany. Our on-line culture constantly confronts us with things that are round, soft and amorphous, things that we are uncertain whether we should cuddle or eat; with unusual things that inspire the judgement that we should defer judgement; and with examples of people who have the virtuosity to fulfil the demands of a post-Fordist workplace, people who are fascinating to watch but who we would never want to be.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Our Weirdness Is Free (AGA-508)

"Our Weirdness is Free: Topics on Independence and Independents" This class will support in-depth academic studies of topics raised the Graduate Seminar class.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Painting Workshop (AGA-553)

This graduate seminar is open to undergraduate students with recommendation from the department chair.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Photography Workshop (AGA-510)

Photography, as a medium and a discourse, is caught between its late modern industrial origins, and its dispersal and dissolution in the age of digitalization, producing a contentious field for both practitioners and theorists alike. Covering the broad field of contemporary theoretical and practical approaches to photography and its history, and moreover seeking to integrate these theoretical and practical applications of the medium, this course charts contemporary debates and practices surrounding the medium of photography through the lens of Vil?Flusser's "Toward a Philosophy of Photography." Ranging from apparatus theory, to semiotics, epistemological to ontological understandings of the medium, students will be exposed to a range of polarities that govern the contemporary discussion of photographic practices, along side an examination of the productive possibilities of the photographic medium itself. Concurrent enrollment in Tech Lab (AGA-505) is required for all students.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Picturing The Artist (AGA-552)

How have artists past and present played with their own public image to critique preceding generations' myths and cliches surrounding the studio? How have they chosen to engage or pointedly neglect the romantic persona of The Artist? Starting with photographs and films of postwar artists at work, this class will look at the ways in which artists 'pose' and self-consciously perform the pragmatic activity of making art. From Hans Namuth's photographs of Jackson Pollock and Hollis Frampton's shots of Frank Stella to Jason Schmidt's contemporary editorial portraits we will look at the variety of models artists have expanded on or re-interpreted. We will also explore the disparate ways in which artists represent themselves including artist's writings, interviews and the studio visit as its own kind of performance. We will also examine the changing definitions of the studio, the artist and how it has altered our understanding of art. "Artists' remarks need to be decoded and interpreted, since they usually belong to a carefully designed "pose" that is staged and authentic, deliberate and accidental, strategic and unconscious at the same time." Isabelle Graw "I think I was very strongly against having to identify myself as an artist. I wanted to identify myself as somebody who was able to make painting... not so much as a craftsman, but just as a person with the capability of making art. ....just paint... without pretending to be an artist" Frank Stella

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Post-Fordist Aesthetics (AGA-558)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Rcnt Hist:Art & Aesthtc 1973- (AGA-588)

This seminar looks to art and theory of the last thirty years to develop a picture of the major thematics and conditions that govern contemporary art today. Drawing from historical analysis, criticism, and critical theory, in addition to case studies and the formal analysis of art, this course attempts to draw out a broad picture of the contemporary art world, offering various methodologies for navigating its seemingly contradictory drives, and disparate agendas, reading this contemporary field in relation to broader socio-economic changes. In keeping with the hybridization of practices, this course will not limit itself by medium or genre, and instead focus on how circulation and distribution, and the art works negotiation with a broader world (both on a material and conceptual level) inform and at times, produce, the work of art.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Rethinnking Feminism (AGA-542)

2013 marks the 50 year anniversary of Betty Friedan's Feminine Mystique, a groundbreaking work that popularized the theoretical considerations of feminism. Yet the term feminism remains maligned, contested, misunderstood. This class will consider the theoretical and historical spectrum of feminism in the postwar world, with a particular eye to explorations in the visual culture of the period.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Sculpture Workshop (AGA-503)

This graduate seminar is open to undergraduate students with recommendation from the department chair.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Shadow Modernity (AGA-520)

In this course, we will examine a range of occultist expression dating from the first half of the 20th Century. This period of unprecedented technological change, horrific warfare and political revolution fostered not only radical innovation, but also provoked a deeply felt distrust in the promise of material progress. For many, the assurances of positivism had rung hollow, inspiring a renewed interest in metaphysical inquiry. With strategies ranging from outright rejection to attempted synthesis, the writers and artists under our consideration sought to reconcile contemporary experience with timeless, transcendental mysteries. As we explore all manner of what historian James Webb termed "rejected knowledge," students will be encouraged to see an investment in alchemy, spiritualism, astrology and kindred subjects as a vital, if hidden, component of the art and culture of the modern era.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Silence (AGA-544)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8775ZmNGFY8. This class will be about silence in literature and art, both as theme and as metaphor. Silence can be the result of a loss of words in the face of the unsayable, a crisis of language, or a stubborn refusal to articulate. The class will read, analyze, and discuss selected excerpts from: Enrique Vila Matas' Bartleby & Co, Hugo von Hoffmansthal's Lord Chandos Letter, selected poems by Emily Dickinson, Kafka's Silence of the Sirens, the work of Lee Lozano (authors may change as course proceeds). Particular attention will be paid to the continuity of thought and usage in works from the 20th and earlier centuries.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Site, Specificity & Context (AGA-583)

Site, Specificity, and Contextuality in Contemporary Art This class will consider the notions of site, the specific, the contextual and environmental in recent and contemporary art. Artists to be discussed include Robert Smithson, Michael Asher, Andrea Fraser, Maria Eichhorn, Francis Alys, and Andreas Siekmann, among others. We will also examine the most important theoretical discussions of site, situation and the specific, drawing on both art theoretical (Smithson, Judd, Robert Morris, Miwon Kwon, James Meyer) and philosophial (Sartre, Debord, Badiou, etc) texts.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Sold Out:Performing the Systm (AGA-585)

Sold Out: Performing the System/Performing the Self Opening with a discussion of the art of Andy Warhol that argues for an appreciation of the full range of the artist's extra-gallery and "Business Art" initiatives as central to his oeuvre, this seminar derives a "performative" model of art-making from his expanded field of endeavor, in order to explore the centrality of Warhol's example for artists working in his aftermath. A curriculum of focused readings provides the armature for the in-class viewing and discussion of work by a broad range of relevant contemporary artists. Two primary avenues will be pursued. I. Andy in an Expanded Field: Andy Warhol is arguably the most influential artist of the later half of 20th century, and yet his legacy remains controversial; indeed, Warhol's example (and particularly his late work) is as often criticized as detrimental for subsequent art as it is celebrated as an enabling force. This course explores the proposition that it is precisely in the "compromised" facets of his practice-the maligned society portraits, the publishing endeavors (Interview, the diaristic writings), the sustained collecting efforts (Time Capsules), the television and advertising appearances, and the all-purpose gadabouting-that we discover the significance of Warhol's example for art today. Indeed, Sold Out considers this network of extra-gallery activity not as the falling off from Warhol's Pop Art triumph that many perceived it to be in the 70s and 80s, but rather as its logical-and uniquely generative-conclusion. A program of reading aimed at highlighting the key tensions in Warhol's reception have been selected with an eye towards opening this expanded view of Warhol's art to in-class debate. II. Outperforming Andy: By "performative," I mean to conjure an ethos that insists on "doing" over "telling," that sees the work of art as a way of moving in the world as opposed to commenting upon or representing it. If Warhol's "canvas" -or better stage-came to encompass the world outside the gallery; indeed, if the market place and the publicity machine demand to be understood as his "mediums" every bit as much as silkscreen and celluloid, then it is this legacy Sold Out proposes to consider vis a vis the relevant concepts of "performativity," "celebration," and the "carnivalesque." Does Warhol's example offer a model of art making that counters the baseline Modernist notion of critique? And what might be at stake in putting forth such a proposition? A broad range of mostly shorter texts will serve as background for the in-class presentation and discussion of contemporary work by artists including Maurizio Cattelan/The Wrong Gallery, Andrea Fraser, David Hammons, Keith Haring, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami (Kaikai Kiki Co.), Richard Prince, Jason Rhoades, and Reena Spaulings.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Something Contemporary (AGA-582)

A survey of texts, art, and films, from the early 20th century to the recent turn of the millenium, will help us grapple with the problem and inheritance of modernism. Full preparation for each class meeting, discussion and presentations, as well as a final paper are required.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Spleen and Ideal (AGA-659)

In this class, we will be considering the prose, poetry and criticism of Symbolism. We will experience Symbolism not as a defined cultural movement,but rather as a web of interconnected concerns, motifs and sensibilities. Flowering forth from a landscape of curdled progress, technological revolution and undermined social mores (sound familiar?),Symbolism sought to examine both the debased and the exalted in its pursuit of meaning. While literature will be the primary focus of the course,discussion of the plastic arts and spiritual movements of mid-to-late 19th Century France will also be included. Embarking on paths divergent, occluded and occult, students will be encouraged to forge connections not only with contrasting works of the period, but also in alliance with, or in opposition to, the cultural productions of our own epoch.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Statuesque: Sclptr After Sclpt (AGA-551)

A close study of the sculptural work of three contemporary artists, KatharinaFritsch, Jeff Koons, and Charles Ray, provides the basis for a consideration of the state and fate of sculpture today. When these far-flung figures first made their presences felt in the late 1970s and early '80s (Fritsch in D?sseldorf, Koons in New York, and Ray in Los Angeles), Minimalism and Conceptualism remained the status quo against which ambitious new art measured and defined itself. Indeed, the work for which these artists are celebratedtoday-pointedly figural, quotidian in reference, and resolutely sculptural-was, at the outset, all but unimaginable as the shape of serious art to come. Examining the artwork itself, both at the level of ideation and production, in tandem with writings both by and about the artists, "Statuesque" excavates the pressures and desires that led these very different artists to reimagine the all but moribund discipline of figural sculpture as one unexpectedly adequate to the present. A close study of the sculptural work of three contemporary artists, KatharinaFritsch, Jeff Koons, and Charles Ray, provides the basis for a consideration of the state and fate of sculpture today. When these far-flung figures first made their presences felt in the late 1970s and early '80s (Fritsch in D?sseldorf, Koons in New York, and Ray in Los Angeles), Minimalism and Conceptualism remained the status quo against which ambitious new art measured and defined itself. Indeed, the work for which these artists are celebratedtoday-pointedly figural, quotidian in reference, and resolutely sculptural-was, at the outset, all but unimaginable as the shape of serious art to come. Examining the artwork itself, both at the level of ideation and production, in tandem with writings both by and about the artists, "Statuesque" excavates the pressures and desires that led these very different artists to reimagine the all but moribund discipline of figural sculpture as one unexpectedly adequate to the present.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Studio Independent Study (GSA-975)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

The Aesthetics of Ethics (AGA-541)

In the last thirty years, art production has increasingly expanded into the realms of social relations and systems of distribution. Such expansions are not only expressed under the umbrella of movements like "relational aesthetics", "institutional critique", or performance alone, but also affect the most conventionally realized object-based practices. Even painting, perhaps the most traditional of art objects, has been increasingly subjected to an analysis that incorporates system of distribution and social relations in its assessments. As the social condition of art objects permeates contemporary art, the question of the quality of the relations which form their supports becomes ever more important as an element of their meaning, for now the boundary of an art object is no longer found at its edges, but in the specific social field it creates. Thus, the evaluation of the relation of ethics (the barometer by which we ascertain the value and quality of interpersonal relations) to aesthetics has become essential in contemporary art. This class consists of a series of "case studies" in contemporary art, looking to the works of artists and instances where ethical contexts create fundamental questions about the nature of art objects, either through the conflicts they create, circumstances they address, or the way in which they are produced. Among notable circumstances which will be addressed in class is the canceled exhibition of Christoph B?chel at MassMoCA, the court battle between Richard Prince and Robert Cariou, Paul Chan's Waiting for Godot in New Orleans, Triple Canopy's unauthorized exhibitions of Cady Noland and David Hammons, among others. Artists discussed will include Tania Bruegera, Jeremy Deller, Urs Fischer, Andrea Fraser, David Hammons, Thomas Hirschhorn, Martin Kippenberger, Kerry James Marshall, Renzo Mertans, Boris Mikhailov, Tim Rollins, Martha Rosler, Santiago Sierra, Hito Steyrl, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Danh Vo among others. In addition, philosophical texts which address the relations between aesthetics and ethics will be read throughout the term, including, Giorgio Agambem, Alain Badiou, Nicolas Bourriaud, Michel Foucault, Jacques Lacan, Bruno Latour, Jacques Ranciere, among others. Class will take place Thursday evenings at 7:30pm. Please note, class will periodically meet off campus, please consider this at the time of enrollment.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

The German Class (AGA-562)

In seven biweekly 4-6 hour sessions, the German Class will visit important sites of contemporary German (and Austrian) culture in Los Angeles, such as the Goethe Institut, the Schindler House, and the Villa Aurora, where we will meet with current artists-in-residence. Along a chronological timeline, we will look at how German and Austrian exiles have influenced the culture of Los Angeles before and during WW2 and how the transatlantic exchange of ideas on art has been organized after the war. We will watch movies and documentaries, look at how Los Angeles is reflected in the work of contemporary German artists, hear lectures on Modernist Architecture, the history of documenta and the Art Academy D?sseldorf, pay special attention to the RAF and its reflection in film and art, and conclude with a conversation on the contemporary art scene in Berlin.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

The Idea of Art: 1830-Present (AGA-587)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

The Mother of All Workshops (AGA-557)



Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 6

The Revolution to Art History (AGA-586)

Classic German-style Art History. Eight museum visits, four classroom lectures and two films. This term we will begin our class with the French Revolution and end with the 1990s. You must take this class if you suffer from three or more of the following conditions: - You have never studied the formal history of art - You've never seen the coolness that is neo-gothic architecture - You like Casper David Friedrich but don't know why - You like Monet but wonder why there are so many calendars - You've never read Baudelaire - You don't know about the dustbin of history - You can't tell the difference between Russian Constructivism and de Stijl - You have no clue what Clement Greenberg was on about - You think Warhol invented Pop - You want to know about what happened when and try to figure out what it means to you and your work

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

The Workshop (AGA-511)

The Workshop will combine technical instruction, historical and critical lectures, group critiques, off-campus site visits, and working days for students working in all media.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Theatricality & Performativity (AGA-522)

This class examines models of theatricality and performativity in a wide variety of media (from performance to sculpture, painting, and video) and sites of reception (from the theater to the exhibition), and considers how questions pertaining to the performative illuminate and expand the parameters of contemporary art. The class will include site visits, reading discussions, and projects that negotiate these questions in theoretical and practical terms.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Theories of Construction (AGA-506)

Concerned with the critiquing of student work. The object of the class is to develop, through class analysis, a sense of the theoretical implications and foundations of the work of each of the participants.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Thesis Continuation (AGA-699)

Required for all students finished with their course work but still working on completing their thesis. Required every semester until thesis is completed and approved.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 0

Urban Ethnography for Artist (AGA-571)

As the core ethnologic research practice, ethnography offers the 21st century artist (and designer) a profound semiotic and performative means of observing, describing, and interpreting the artifacts, mores, structures and beliefs of cultural institutions and societies. Throughout the term, students will have the chance to acquaint themselves with the assumptions, the practices and the residual effects of ethnographic research. In doing so, they will learn to develop the swift ability to recognize and understand cultural patterns or memes in order to empower themselves with the perspectives and skills necessary for their professional practice.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Web of Yarns:Narrtv in Cntxt (AGA-531)

In this course, we will examine the concept of narrative within a variety of forms. Engaging with a diversity of topics - including the novel, the epistolary, painting, theatre, film, music and dance, the core of this class will be the analysis of narrative structures and the manner in which they convey meaning. Students will be encouraged to consider narrative as an essential part of ones experience of the universe, and thus an invaluable tool at the ready for artists of any ilk, irrespective of time period or media.

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

Writing About Art (AGA-543)

This course will examine different models for writing about art through readings, discussion and written exercises. 1. Artists Writings: journals, manifestos, letters, interviews, zines, text as artwork, artist statements 2. Experimental Writing: fiction, poetry, collaborations 3. Critical Writing: descriptive analysis, the essay

Prerequisite: n/a
Course Credit: 3

   
.Credits.Copyright.Privacy Policy.Terms of Use